BBQ Central

BBQ Central (https://www.bbq-4-u.com/forum/)
-   Grilling (https://www.bbq-4-u.com/forum/f15/)
-   -   Pounding steak for tenderizing? (https://www.bbq-4-u.com/forum/f15/pounding-steak-for-tenderizing-235.html)

Captain Morgan 02-12-2005 09:10 AM

Pounding steak for tenderizing?
 
Now remember what forum we're on here :lol:
I met a guy yesterday who actually travels to about 7 different restaurants during the day, and they pay him to pound their steaks for that night.

Now in all the years I've been reading these expert forums, I've never head any body say they do this. I've got a little mallet I sometimes use on tougher cuts of meat, but tonight I'm doing ribeyes. If pounding them would make it better, I'll try it.

Advice? And remember what forum we're on! :wink:

Captain Morgan 02-12-2005 09:49 AM

Now Susan I've seen those but it seems to me that on a grill that could lead to the juices dripping out and leaving a dry steak.....I guess if that were true, then people wouldn't use them. I wonder if there is a difference between using that over a live flame or burning embers, as opposed to throwing it in a broiler or on pan.

Greg Rempe 02-12-2005 09:59 AM

Honestly Capt. I would have trouble hammering or Jaccarding my steak. If you get a good cut from a butcher and you know how to cook it well, you shouldn't need to hammer the poor cut, should you? :shock:

jminion 02-12-2005 10:47 AM

On a cheaper cut pounding or using a Jaccard can help tenderness, the finish temp will still regulate the juiceness of the product.
Jim

Captain Morgan 02-12-2005 10:49 AM

as fate would have it, I have TWO steaks in the fridge. Looks like experiment time tonight. Thinking about coating one in steak seasoning and putting it in a freezer bag with some woosh, then pounding. The other will get the same treatment without the pounding.

Greg Rempe 02-12-2005 10:53 AM

What cuts are they Capt. I usually get Porterhouse 1 1/2" thick cook to mid-rare...washed down with a TALL COLD BUDWEISER!!

Captain Morgan 02-12-2005 10:58 AM

ribeyes, 1 inch thick...they were on sale for $4.99 a pound, so how could I resist.

Larry Wolfe 02-12-2005 11:01 AM

I've pounded meat before to "stretch" it out, in order to roll it and stuff some sort of filling in it. Or pound a steak to make cube steak, but like Greg said if you purchase your steaks from a decent store/butcher there shouldn't be much need to pound the meat in order to tenderize.

john pen 02-12-2005 11:06 AM

Ribeyes on sale here to..look like nice marbeling on them. Ive not cooked them before (I m a sirlon lover) but arent they a pretty good cut that shouldn't need pounding ?

Captain Morgan 02-12-2005 11:07 AM

Wonder why the restaurants pay that guy to do it? I know at least one, Rossi's, has an impeccable reputation for their food. I assume they are buying a very good grade.

02-12-2005 11:25 AM

I'm with John ~ No need to touch a ribeye except with a little salt, ground pepper and a bit of garlic powder. 1" is a bit on the thin side (for me) so your timing will be a little more critical. Damn, I'm gettin' hongry!! :D

Woodman 02-12-2005 11:30 AM

Must...........restrain............no ..............beat..............arghhhhhhhhhhh

Captain Morgan 02-12-2005 12:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bill Hays
I'm with John ~ No need to touch a ribeye except with a little salt, ground pepper and a bit of garlic powder. 1" is a bit on the thin side (for me) so your timing will be a little more critical. Damn, I'm gettin' hongry!! :D

Yeah, these were pre-cut. I'll do it both ways anyway, just to have something to do.

Shawn White 02-12-2005 03:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by john pen
Ribeyes on sale here to..look like nice marbeling on them. Ive not cooked them before (I m a sirlon lover) but arent they a pretty good cut that shouldn't need pounding ?

I did a bunch of ribeyes back in the fall. Some were aged 21 days, some were not. The aged ones were exquisitely tender the others were not but they were still very good. I don't think I would pound the aged ones but I might be inclined to try it with non-aged.

Captain Morgan 02-12-2005 06:48 PM

okie dokie....did both side by side. The thinner one of course reached temp quicker, so it rested longer. There was a difference. The pounded steak was more tender. Juicy about the same. (ducks for cover)

Captain Morgan 02-12-2005 08:15 PM

yep, it was pounded. I understand what you're saying about the Jaccard....that must be the secret.

Greg Rempe 02-12-2005 08:18 PM

What did you use to pound the steak...I am surprised it was more tender than the non-pounded?!?! Might have to try it!! :shock:

Captain Morgan 02-12-2005 09:00 PM

well, I had this silver hammer (I named it Maxwell) that was flat on one side and had these little teeth on the other. I hit it first with the teeth, then added that special rub I told Finney I was gonna get him weeks ago and didn't, then slipped in in the bag with Mr. Mist and Olive oil, and pounded with the flat side. I'm no expert, but that's how I'm doing it next time. :shock:

Finney 02-13-2005 09:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Captain Morgan
well, I had this silver hammer (I named it Maxwell) that was flat on one side and had these little teeth on the other. I hit it first with the teeth, then added that special rub I told Finney I was gonna get him weeks ago and didn't, then slipped in in the bag with Mr. Mist and Olive oil, and pounded with the flat side. I'm no expert, but that's how I'm doing it next time. :shock:

Swell name for your silver hammer.
I forgot about that rub... good thing you reminded me.

02-13-2005 11:19 AM

I think a 2nd test is in order...


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:52 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.