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Old 07-03-2007, 12:48 PM   #1
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TPJ Question

Hey I love putting Texas pepper jelly on my BBQ ribs. I love the flavors that I get from using them.

My question is:

Is there anyway to tone down the heat and not lose the flavors, so that it could be used on competition meats?
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Old 07-03-2007, 01:57 PM   #2
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Re: TPJ Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by ddog27
Hey I love putting Texas pepper jelly on my BBQ ribs. I love the flavors that I get from using them.

My question is:

Is there anyway to tone down the heat and not lose the flavors, so that it could be used on competition meats?
Add a simple syrup to the TPJ. 50/50 sugar and water, bring to a boil, then cool. Then mix in with the TPJ until you get the flavor desired.
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Old 07-03-2007, 02:04 PM   #3
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Really? Cool!
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Old 07-03-2007, 02:56 PM   #4
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Thanks for the info Wolfey
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Old 07-03-2007, 03:38 PM   #5
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When glazing with jellies or jams, I usually melt them over low heat, and thin them with another liquid, usually a spirit, or with butter.

In the case of pepper jelly, my preferred cut is white rum, at a 50/50 ratio. Tequila, brandy and bourbon would also be good choices. The purpose of thinning is not only to modify the taste profile, but also to ... well ... thin the glaze. Glazing is much the same as lacquering. Several thin coats give more luster and depth then a few thick coats -- and are to be preferred.

I recommend simmering the glaze for at least a little while so that most of the volatile spirits are evaporated before using to eliminate any accidental flare ups. Warm glazes go on better than cool glazes, so you can "cook safe" for other, more manly reasons.

As to Larry's syrup recommendation, "de gustibus non diputandum." It's not that I disagree, as "sweet" is one of the few effective ways to cut heat. But I find simple syrup too sweet to use as a thinner with pepper jelly or any other jelly for that matter. Since your taste may differ, try it both ways. You were running low on white rum anyway and this will give you a chance to make some wife-pleasing mojitos. So pick up some fresh limes, mint and seltzer water while you're out.
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Old 07-03-2007, 04:17 PM   #6
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Add the same flavor jelly (w/o habanero) to the habanero jelly until you get the heat you desire. A 1 to one ratio will cut the heat in half while retaining 100% of the jelly flavor. Make sure you use a good quality jelly.
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Old 07-03-2007, 08:09 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze
As to Larry's syrup recommendation, "de gustibus non diputandum." It's not that I disagree, as "sweet" is one of the few effective ways to cut heat. But I find simple syrup too sweet to use as a thinner with pepper jelly or any other jelly for that matter. Since your taste may differ, try it both ways. You were running low on white rum anyway and this will give you a chance to make some wife-pleasing mojitos. So pick up some fresh limes, mint and seltzer water while you're out.
Rich, Darren was asking about toning the heat of the pepper jelly, not thining it, heat alone will thin the jelly. Using the simple syrup will cut the heat without changing the flavor of the jelly too much.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kloset BBQR
Add the same flavor jelly (w/o habanero) to the habanero jelly until you get the heat you desire. A 1 to one ratio will cut the heat in half while retaining 100% of the jelly flavor. Make sure you use a good quality jelly.
Good idea Dallas, IF you are able to find that particular flavor of jelly, most cases that will work perfectly!
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Old 07-03-2007, 10:31 PM   #8
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Glenn...don't forget to use the...ah, nevermind...
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Old 07-03-2007, 11:10 PM   #9
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Larry,

Not to argue, but purely for discussion's sake ... I understand the impulse behind using simple syrup. As I said, sweetness is one of the few flavors counteracting heat. The others being sour and salt. However, sweet or not the principal effect of the addition of simple syrup is to dilute or thin the pepper concentration -- and similarly with the suggestion to add more of the same type (probably apple) jelly.

Classic (or maybe I should say turn of the century French) technique demands glaze so thin that it can be spread with a goose feather -- which is the classic glazing "brush." That usually means adding a thinning liquid to fruit jellies and always includes a thinning liquid to anything that isn't absolutely clear or thickened by anything other than pectin or gelatin. The idea, as I said, is to lay several of the thinnest coats possible in order to maximize shine and depth of color.

Of course, you're not really looking for a jewel-like shine on barbecued ribs. So, in the greater scheme it's not that important. The real problem I have with adding either simple syrup or more jelly is that I object to the sweetness. And as I said earlier, it's simply a matter of taste.
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Old 07-04-2007, 07:21 AM   #10
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Seems like another foil or no foil debate. Just do what works for you!
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Old 07-04-2007, 08:53 AM   #11
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Where's Kevin when you need him!!

FWIW...none of the TXPJ have ever been hot enough to cut for me...and I put it in my sacue like that Glenn guy does...via Woodman!
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Old 07-04-2007, 11:12 AM   #12
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You might try requesting that Craig make you a case of the same flavor jelly you want to use with no Chili's in it so you can thin it down with the same flavored jelly. You would probably have to buy the whole batch but that's not really that much jelly. He also has a finishing sauce that's thinner than the jellies that he might consider making with no heat. It doesn't hurt to ask. He's not as scary as he looks.
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Old 07-05-2007, 03:07 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Rempe
Where's Kevin when you need him!!

FWIW...none of the TXPJ have ever been hot enough to cut for me...and I put it in my sacue like that Glenn guy does...via Woodman!
Fruit Habanero Jelly

Hey Greg, you can make your own pepper jelly and customize the fruits, seasonings and heat level to your liking. The link provided is my own experience, personalize for your own thang.

Make a few single batches, when you find something you love multiply it .... big batches aren't much longer than small batches.

After this post and of what I made my favs in order are Pineapple, Berry then Orange

But there really are no limits to this other than your own creativity. The recipe should work if you maintain the ratio of fruit and vegetable flesh to other ingrediants (keeping subs to strictly fruit and veggies).

Finally, you don't have to feel unmanly making jelly cuz it's kickazz hot habanero jelly.

The same applies to this thread's original post, if you find TPJ jalapeno too hot you can make your own pepper jelly to the heat level you like this way. Again, just try to keep the volume of pepper flesh about the same and lower the amount of hot pepper to your liking.
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Old 07-05-2007, 03:29 PM   #14
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Thanks for the info, Shawn...nice to see you back!
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Old 07-05-2007, 03:31 PM   #15
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I'm gonna backup Rich on this one folks, use spirits to make a glaze if the hard stuff is too much for ya use wine BOY, they make sweet wine too. Multiple layers make a fine finish & color ass well. Opps,,, did I say dat?
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