Old wood? - BBQ Central

Go Back   BBQ Central > General > General Barbecue
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-19-2007, 09:25 AM   #1
Baby Back


 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 68
Old wood?

Last weekend we were cooking at a friends house that used to be his father's house using cherry wood from his father's wood pile. His father's been gone for about 3 years now. My buddy has no idea how long the wood's been there.

The wood wasn't rotted or wet, but it didn't seem to give off much heat. Can wood be to old to use?
__________________

__________________
I am he as you are he as you are me and we are all together.

Check out my Blog: Http://whitetrashbbq.blogspot.com
BrooklynQ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2007, 09:28 AM   #2
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
Bill The Grill Guy's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Virginia
Posts: 5,449
Re: Old wood?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooklynQ
Last weekend we were cooking at a friends house that used to be his father's house using cherry wood from his father's wood pile. His father's been gone for about 3 years now. My buddy has no idea how long the wood's been there.

The wood wasn't rotted or wet, but it didn't seem to give off much heat. Can wood be to old to use?
Yep, after a while wood looses its ability to produce sufficiant amounts of BTU's. I had some that was like that. Just mix it in with some newer stuff. No sence in waisting it.
__________________

__________________
Bill The Grill Guy
www.billthegrillguy.com
"Life, it's what you do between meals."

http://img76.imageshack.us/img76/3674/platezi0.png
Bill The Grill Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2007, 10:36 PM   #3
Cooker
 
PantherTailgater's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Southern Part of Heaven
Posts: 270
Re: Old wood?

Quote:
Originally Posted by wdroller
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill The Grill Guy
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooklynQ
Last weekend we were cooking at a friends house that used to be his father's house using cherry wood from his father's wood pile. His father's been gone for about 3 years now. My buddy has no idea how long the wood's been there.

The wood wasn't rotted or wet, but it didn't seem to give off much heat. Can wood be to old to use?
Yep, after a while wood looses its ability to produce sufficiant amounts of BTU's. I had some that was like that. Just mix it in with some newer stuff. No sence in waisting it.
Bill, please don't misunderstand me, but I really would like to know of any evidence you have re this. I mean if it's dry and not rotted.

Can't explain it scientifically but I know that Bill's right based on my experiences with fireplaces, wood stoves and outdoor wood grills that my dad used for years when I was a young man.
PantherTailgater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2007, 11:23 PM   #4
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
bigwheel's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Foat Wuth
Posts: 9,951
Well cheery wood aint fit to cook with when its just right let alone when it getting long in the tooth. Discover Oak sometime.

bigwheel
bigwheel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2007, 09:07 AM   #5
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
Bill The Grill Guy's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Virginia
Posts: 5,449
Re: Old wood?

Quote:
Originally Posted by wdroller
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill The Grill Guy
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooklynQ
Last weekend we were cooking at a friends house that used to be his father's house using cherry wood from his father's wood pile. His father's been gone for about 3 years now. My buddy has no idea how long the wood's been there.

The wood wasn't rotted or wet, but it didn't seem to give off much heat. Can wood be to old to use?
Yep, after a while wood looses its ability to produce sufficiant amounts of BTU's. I had some that was like that. Just mix it in with some newer stuff. No sence in waisting it.
Bill, please don't misunderstand me, but I really would like to know of any evidence you have re this. I mean if it's dry and not rotted.
Well wdroller, the only evidence I have is 14 years of seeing houses burn, 42 years of wood home heating and 7 years of cooking with wood. It is my experience that as wood gets older it looses its moister. Moister is what controls the heat and the "off burning" of wood. Its not the wood that burns, its the gas that wood gives off that burns. If you look at wood when its on fire, the flame is above the wood. Thats the gasses burning. As wood gets older and looses its moister, the gasses change chemicaly. Thats why an old house will burn fast and hot and a new house will burn slower but steady.

Quote:
British thermal unit
n. (Abbr. BTU or Btu)
The quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water from 60° to 61°F at a constant pressure of one atmosphere.
So, if there is less water in the wood, then the heat will be hotter and faster.
__________________
Bill The Grill Guy
www.billthegrillguy.com
"Life, it's what you do between meals."

http://img76.imageshack.us/img76/3674/platezi0.png
Bill The Grill Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2007, 09:10 AM   #6
Moderator
 
wittdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: West Seneca NY
Posts: 9,860
Re: Old wood?

[quote=Bill The Grill Guy]
Quote:
Originally Posted by wdroller
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Bill The Grill Guy":3npzwiuq
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooklynQ
Last weekend we were cooking at a friends house that used to be his father's house using cherry wood from his father's wood pile. His father's been gone for about 3 years now. My buddy has no idea how long the wood's been there.

The wood wasn't rotted or wet, but it didn't seem to give off much heat. Can wood be to old to use?
Yep, after a while wood looses its ability to produce sufficiant amounts of BTU's. I had some that was like that. Just mix it in with some newer stuff. No sence in waisting it.
Bill, please don't misunderstand me, but I really would like to know of any evidence you have re this. I mean if it's dry and not rotted.
Well wdroller, the only evidence I have is 14 years of seeing houses burn, 42 years of wood home heating and 7 years of cooking with wood. It is my experience that as wood gets older it looses its moister. Moister is what controls the heat and the "off burning" of wood. Its not the wood that burns, its the gas that wood gives off that burns. If you look at wood when its on fire, the flame is above the wood. Thats the gasses burning. As wood gets older and looses its moister, the gasses change chemicaly. Thats why an old house will burn fast and hot and a new house will burn slower but steady.

Quote:
British thermal unit
n. (Abbr. BTU or Btu)
The quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water from 60° to 61°F at a constant pressure of one atmosphere.
So, if there is less water in the wood, then the heat will be hotter and faster.[/quote:3npzwiuq]
And here I was thinking your were supposed to be stopping those houses from burning..
__________________
Save the gas for the criminals Q with wood...

I get more sauced then my Ribs

My Bark is as good as my Bite!

Swine so fine it's Criminal

Never trust a skinny cook!!!!!!!!
wittdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2007, 09:15 AM   #7
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
Bill The Grill Guy's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Virginia
Posts: 5,449
Re: Old wood?

[quote=wittdog]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill The Grill Guy
Quote:
Originally Posted by wdroller
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Bill The Grill Guy":2al0p8f4
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrooklynQ
Last weekend we were cooking at a friends house that used to be his father's house using cherry wood from his father's wood pile. His father's been gone for about 3 years now. My buddy has no idea how long the wood's been there.

The wood wasn't rotted or wet, but it didn't seem to give off much heat. Can wood be to old to use?
Yep, after a while wood looses its ability to produce sufficiant amounts of BTU's. I had some that was like that. Just mix it in with some newer stuff. No sence in waisting it.
Bill, please don't misunderstand me, but I really would like to know of any evidence you have re this. I mean if it's dry and not rotted.
Well wdroller, the only evidence I have is 14 years of seeing houses burn, 42 years of wood home heating and 7 years of cooking with wood. It is my experience that as wood gets older it looses its moister. Moister is what controls the heat and the "off burning" of wood. Its not the wood that burns, its the gas that wood gives off that burns. If you look at wood when its on fire, the flame is above the wood. Thats the gasses burning. As wood gets older and looses its moister, the gasses change chemicaly. Thats why an old house will burn fast and hot and a new house will burn slower but steady.

Quote:
British thermal unit
n. (Abbr. BTU or Btu)
The quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water from 60° to 61°F at a constant pressure of one atmosphere.
So, if there is less water in the wood, then the heat will be hotter and faster.
And here I was thinking your were supposed to be stopping those houses from burning.. [/quote:2al0p8f4]

Does a prize fighter just step into a ring without knowing his opponiant? Does a cop just start making arrests without knowing the laws. I dont think so. You have to know before getting in over your head.
__________________
Bill The Grill Guy
www.billthegrillguy.com
"Life, it's what you do between meals."

http://img76.imageshack.us/img76/3674/platezi0.png
Bill The Grill Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2007, 09:17 AM   #8
Moderator
 
wittdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: West Seneca NY
Posts: 9,860
Does a BBQ man buy a thermopen that reads in C.........
Just having a little fun Bill...
Can you tell I'm back to work and as misrable as ever
__________________
Save the gas for the criminals Q with wood...

I get more sauced then my Ribs

My Bark is as good as my Bite!

Swine so fine it's Criminal

Never trust a skinny cook!!!!!!!!
wittdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2007, 09:20 AM   #9
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
Bill The Grill Guy's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Virginia
Posts: 5,449
Quote:
Originally Posted by wittdog
Does a BBQ man buy a thermopen that reads in C.........
Just having a little fun Bill...
Can you tell I'm back to work and as misrable as ever
Only when you can save 30 bucks. Besides, its not that hard to figure out. Even for a Yankee from NY. Well maybe not a Yankee from NY but I didnt have a problem.
__________________
Bill The Grill Guy
www.billthegrillguy.com
"Life, it's what you do between meals."

http://img76.imageshack.us/img76/3674/platezi0.png
Bill The Grill Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2007, 09:22 AM   #10
Moderator
 
wittdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: West Seneca NY
Posts: 9,860
At least the other side of the Mt. has one that reads in F......
I can just see you know bill...overalls...and your boots off...trying to use your toes to do the conversion.... :P
__________________
Save the gas for the criminals Q with wood...

I get more sauced then my Ribs

My Bark is as good as my Bite!

Swine so fine it's Criminal

Never trust a skinny cook!!!!!!!!
wittdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2007, 09:27 AM   #11
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
Bill The Grill Guy's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Virginia
Posts: 5,449
Quote:
Originally Posted by wittdog
At least the other side of the Mt. has one that reads in F......
I can just see you know bill...overalls...and your boots off...trying to use your toes to do the conversion.... :P
Okay, I'll give ya the last word. But I do know my wood.
__________________
Bill The Grill Guy
www.billthegrillguy.com
"Life, it's what you do between meals."

http://img76.imageshack.us/img76/3674/platezi0.png
Bill The Grill Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2007, 09:28 AM   #12
Moderator
 
wittdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: West Seneca NY
Posts: 9,860
Bill I agree with you inregards to old wood..not burning as well.
__________________
Save the gas for the criminals Q with wood...

I get more sauced then my Ribs

My Bark is as good as my Bite!

Swine so fine it's Criminal

Never trust a skinny cook!!!!!!!!
wittdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2007, 10:50 AM   #13
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
Cliff H.'s Avatar


 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Jonesboro, Arkansas
Posts: 6,143
Was the wood lite weight like Balsa comparatively speaking ?
__________________
" Never let a day go by "
Cliff H. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2007, 09:18 AM   #14
Smoker


 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Essex Jct. Vermont
Posts: 348
Robert, I agree almost 100% with Bill. As wood gets older and dries out it does burn faster, because it's dry. But the wood gets lighter and therefore you get less BTU's or heat out of each stick. I burn between 5-10 cords a year to heat my home. I think I heard that all wood has the same BTU's per pound. Heavier woods like hickory and apple have more BTU's per stick then something like popular.

I also think the flavor of the wood gets blander. That's why just about everyone doesn't like kiln dried wood. If it's the only thing you can get then use what you can.

I use cherry and like to split is as I need it. I cut the seasoned wood into chunks and keep the maul near the pit. Freshly split wood smells great and it's easier to split a few chunks at a time then a whole load.
__________________
Rich

www.lostnationvt.com
Rich Decker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2007, 09:37 AM   #15
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Myrtle Beach
Posts: 14,162
so...does anyone cook with green/fresh cut wood? Why?
__________________
The trouble with quotes on the internet is that it difficult to determine whether or not they are genuine - Abraham Lincoln
Captain Morgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2007, 10:05 AM   #16
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
Cliff H.'s Avatar


 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Jonesboro, Arkansas
Posts: 6,143
I read somewhere that the Peach Kissed BBQ guy uses green peach wood.
__________________
" Never let a day go by "
Cliff H. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2007, 11:27 AM   #17
Smoker
 
boar_d_laze's Avatar


 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 334
A few people cook with green wood. There's a fair bit of discussion from the big boys about it too. But what isn't discussed is the fact that you need a BIG firebox to get away with it. Try it in a small offset or a WSM and the product will taste acrid and horrible; plus you and your guests will feel ill. Invite the boss.

Cookers with big fireboxes perform differently across a broad spectrum of paramaters than small fireboxes. One of the differences is that big fireboxes are simply less sensitive to bunk wood. Green wood in your 10' Klose? By all means. In your Silver Smoker? Are you nuts? The same is true for bark, doncha know? The longer I fool around with barbecue, the more aware I am of the differences imposed by different types of cookers.

Wild and black cherry's tastes are more consistent with fruit woods than non-fruit woods. In strength, about equal to maple or pecan, and richer than citrus, for instance. Cherry is incredibly good with fish on its own. For poultry or pork, cherry is okay on its own, but better in a blend.
__________________

__________________
What were we talking about?

Klose Steak Grill with Swing Set
Backwoods Fatboy with DigiQ II
Other Stuff
boar_d_laze is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off







Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×