Lift a Beer to the Inventors of Texas Barbecue - BBQ Central

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Old 08-17-2007, 08:04 PM   #1
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Lift a Beer to the Inventors of Texas Barbecue

Germans Rock !!!!

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For many people, German food often conjures up images of sauerkraut and boiled pork roasts and not barbecue. However, like most cooking traditions, German cuisine began long ago on an open flame. One of their greatest contributions to the world includes smoked and grilled sausages. Now, I know that the Germans didn't invent sausage, but when we talk Germany we have to at least mention it.

Immigrant Influence: When I think of German food, I think of Texas. Why Texas, you ask? Well if you fly into San Antonio and take your rental car north about 20 minutes (depending on traffic, of course) you will find the little town of New Braunfels. This is a German inspired town. In the early days of the Republic, Sam Houston needed a source of population for his new country, so he appealed to German immigrants.
These immigrants began settling throughout Texas preserving most of their culture, resulting in German style cooking within Texas.

Brisket: Most importantly the Germans brought us Brisket. Brisket was a worthless cut of meat in America that would end up ground for chili or stew. The old German tradition put tough brisket in a Dutch oven to cook low and slow until it's tender. It wasn't until the 1950's that a couple of German butchers put a brisket in a smoker to make modern Texas Barbecue.

The great thing about ordering food in restaurants in New Braunfels and Fredericksburg is that you can get a plate of BBQ ribs, German sausage, potato salad, and baked beans without knowing which is Texan and which is German. Fredericksburg (west of Austin by 100 miles or so) used to be a German speaking town. Now, with the exception of a few German cultural festivals, these places are all American …..sorry, Texan.

Potato Salad: In addition to sausage, Germans have always had a strong liking for potato salad. Though true German potato salad is very different from what most Americans think potato salad should be. It is an important side dish to barbecue like coleslaw and beer. Hmmm, Beer, Germany, could there be a connection? I know that a lot of die hard barbecuers will disagree with me, but I believe that Texan Germans can be credited with creating most of what we think of as the traditional barbecue meal. Smoked sausage, potato salad, beer and cole slaw all have strong roots in German culture. So, next time you lift a rack of ribs off the grill and lift a dark and bitter beer to your lips, think of the brave explorers of the American frontier who ventured to Texas with an invite from Sam Houston.
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Old 08-17-2007, 08:24 PM   #2
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Where did you get that article, Sapo...Cool!
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Old 08-17-2007, 09:54 PM   #3
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I think that it's relative to where your from. Yes, that statement would be some what true if you grew up in Texas. But if you grew up in Carolina, it would be all about the pork.

A good article none the less. But a bit biased I believe. For me, although I grew up in Carolina I definately gravitate towards all things pork and chicken. But I do love me some smoked brisket and sausage. But that could very well be my German roots coming through.

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Old 08-18-2007, 07:02 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Rempe
Where did you get that article, Sapo...Cool!
Greg, I was surfing around looking for those vintage bbq grils from the 1950's and found the article here: http://bbq.about.com/od/regionalande.../aa053197a.htm


Here's more too: http://bbq.about.com/od/regionalandethniccooking
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Old 08-18-2007, 09:25 AM   #5
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My German ancestors came over from Germany before WW1 & settled in Texas Our last name was origanaly Spelled Foltz They change it to Folse In fear of deportation during the war
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Old 08-18-2007, 09:30 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by 007bond-jb
My German ancestors came over from Germany before WW1 & settled in Texas Our last name was origanaly Spelled Foltz They change it to Folse In fear of deportation during the war
I knew there was something I liked about you JB!!!
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Old 08-18-2007, 09:50 AM   #7
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Germanic settlers are also largely responsible for South
Carolina's mustard based sauce you find in the midlands.
It has been proposed that Spanish settlers coming up
from Florida who introduced pigs and vinegar to the
Indians around Port Royal on the SC coast are where the
true origins of American BBQ began.
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Old 08-18-2007, 09:57 AM   #8
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You would think the Irish would have invented the "potato salad"...I invented "Tripas and Bacon"....
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Old 08-18-2007, 11:41 AM   #9
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Always heard the Hill Country Germans was the ones who figgered out the edibility of smoked briskets back in the 40's-50's...so suspect that part be accurate. Prior to that time they had trouble peddling the stuff. Now they can keep their old brown tater salad. Januine yeller Texas mustard tater salad is the best. That was of course invented by my Grandma..Talmadge Horton Wheeler back when Old Shep was still just a pup.

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Old 08-18-2007, 12:31 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by bigwheel
Always heard the Hill Country Germans was the ones who figgered out the edibility of smoked briskets back in the 40's-50's...so suspect that part be accurate. Prior to that time they had trouble peddling the stuff. Now they can keep their old brown tater salad. Januine yeller Texas mustard tater salad is the best. That was of course invented by my Grandma..Talmadge Horton Wheeler back when Old Shep was still just a pup.

bigwheel
Do you remember when "Fajitas aka shirt steaks" were junk and ground up for ground beef? I used to take ice chests of it with dry ice to California to my friends in the 1980's...Boy times have changed, and so did the price...
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Old 08-18-2007, 12:53 PM   #11
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Hell, even the cost of flank steak has gone up. I used to get those all the time when they were cheap.
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Old 08-18-2007, 02:16 PM   #12
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Yeppers...I can remember when skirt steak was considered about worthless...same with chicken wings. They was classed in with chitterlings and ox tails as being not intended for consumption by white folks. Then along come the yups with their buffalo wings and Fajitas and the price went crazy. Wonder how long it take for the yups to screw up turkey necks?

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