Homemade BBQ Rub Suggestions needed - BBQ Central

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Old 05-25-2005, 10:14 AM   #1
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Homemade BBQ Rub Suggestions needed

I usually use Tony Chachere's More Spice for my ribs. I'm getting where I want to try something else. I would like to make it myself so I made the following:

Basic Barbecue Rub
P. 441 How To Grill
Steven Raichlen

¼ cup firmly packed brown sugar
¼ up sweet paprika
3 tablespoons black pepper
3 tablespoons coarse salt
1 tablespoon hickory-smoked salt
2 teaspoons garlic powder
2 teaspoons onion powder
2 teaspoons celery seeds
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper.

I realize this is a basic rub but it seems to need something for my taste. I haven't tried it on any meat yet.

Any suggestions?
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Old 05-25-2005, 10:32 AM   #2
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You might want to try some chili powder, Colman's Dry Mustard, thyme or other herb, cumin (just a little IMO), maybe something like nutmeg or cinnamon for that something that people recognize but aren't quite sure what it is.

All depends if you're looking for a sweet or savory profile.

Lastly, I always use granulated garlic and onion, I think it has a better flavor, just my $.02 (the price of admission).
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Old 05-25-2005, 10:38 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce B
You might want to try some chili powder, Colman's Dry Mustard, thyme or other herb, cumin (just a little IMO), maybe something like nutmeg or cinnamon for that something that people recognize but aren't quite sure what it is.

All depends if you're looking for a sweet or savory profile.

Lastly, I always use granulated garlic and onion, I think it has a better flavor, just my $.02 (the price of admission).
Bruce took the words right out of my mouth!!!

Just add little bits at a time of whatever you decide to add. You can always add a little more but you can't take it out once you've added it!
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Old 05-25-2005, 10:39 AM   #4
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In addition to BruceB's suggestions
I like to add fresh grounf corriander
to beef or allspice to pork.
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Old 05-25-2005, 10:44 AM   #5
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If you are putting it on ribs, try putting whole mustard seeds in it. At the very least, Bruce's suggestion of Coleman's is a good one.
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Old 05-25-2005, 11:01 AM   #6
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I really prefer coriander to cumin, and I like a different rub for each cut of meat. Like Bruce said, it depends on what you like. Do you want it hotter, sweeter, or more savory?
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Old 05-25-2005, 11:30 AM   #7
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I use a little bit of both corriander and cumin
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Old 05-26-2005, 12:49 PM   #8
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There are way too many ways to put rubs together than can be discussed. They are all personal tastes. One of Paul Kirks books deals with the creation of sauces and rubs and how to start to put flavors together. The only advice I might impart here is to use the best quality ingredients you can find. I have fun toasting and grinding my own spices. If you make your own chilie powder one time, I promise you will never go back to store bought again. Recipes are all over the net. Your better stores like Earth Fare or Whole Foods will carry a wider variety and higher quality spice. Penzey's on the net is a good start as well. Enjoy the adventure.

Good Q!

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Old 05-26-2005, 06:20 PM   #9
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Quote:
The only advice I might impart here is to use the best quality ingredients you can find.
I could not agree more. Best quality ingredients make a huge difference to me. I buy nearly all my dried spices and herbs from Penzey's and have for years. They have consistent quality, good prices, and reasonable and fast shipping.

I, too, toast and grind my own spices and peppers. Hard to beat those flavors.

And I, too, make different rubs for different meats as well as different rubs for different cuts of the same meat. I want the rub to complement the meat and the sauce, so I frequently modify the rub when I'm making a different sauce.

The only thing I'd say additionally (which echoes Jack and Bruce) is to try a good pure chili powder--in place of the paprika and possibly in place of the cayenne as well. Most paprikas don't have a whole lot of flavor but are good carrying agents for the other stuff in the rub; paprika mixes with--and helps--everything spread evenly when you apply it. Cayenne has heat but not lots of flavor. A good pure ground chili (or a blend of 2 or 3) can provide flavor, heat, and the carrying ability of paprika. Ancho has good, somewhat fruity, flavor and is mild. New Mexico chilies are usually hot to extra-hot (there are a couple medium-heat ones), and have good flavor. Guajillo has spice and an earthy, deeper flavor. There are many more.
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Old 05-26-2005, 06:28 PM   #10
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A great book you should buy is, Paul Kirk's Championship Barbecue Sauces. He goes step by step on how to make your own original rub. Good advice from a man who knows Q!
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