Cold weather WSM use - Page 3 - BBQ Central

Go Back   BBQ Central > General > General Barbecue
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-18-2008, 07:58 AM   #21
BBQ Central Pro


 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 791
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigwheel
Hey..try digging out the Owners Manuel and follow the directions. That should work.

bigwheel
It lights charcoal just fine
__________________

Shawn White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2008, 09:31 AM   #22
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
Pigs On The Wing BBQ's Avatar


 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Akron New York
Posts: 6,922
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigwheel
Good Lawdy Miz Claudie..I cant believe anybody give somebody out a dumb owners manuel like that. Guessing either the boy has sold out to yankmes or the dumbasses really are located on the E. side of the Sabine. Uncle bigwheel will guide you through this deal. Now you got a prickley pear burner? This is have to know type stuff. Kindly do not listen to any retards who talk about lighting newspapers under a Weber Charcoal Chimney. Only folks who do that kinda nonsense is from up North. I mean who would even buy one of them liberal rags let alone have some sheets of it laying around in the Crib? We can proceed as soon as it becomes evident if you got a flame thrower or not. My Uncle Jim used to make the Japs come outta the hidey holes on Guadacanal ya know using a gizmo not too far removed. If you aint got one snag it at Harbor Freight and kindly repoat back. Thanks.

bigwheel
Nice Jeff.
__________________

__________________
The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that,
you've got it made. -Groucho Marx (1890-1977)
www.oinktoberfest.com
Team Gruber Mister BBQ
KCBS Citified Judge 8282
Tomorrow is just your future yesterday
Pigs On The Wing BBQ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2008, 11:27 AM   #23
BBQ Centralite
 
Woodman's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Mentor, Oh
Posts: 4,457
Well, perhaps he put too fine a point on it, but he is right!
__________________
"I was born to cook for people"
Woodman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2008, 02:11 PM   #24
Wizard of Que
 
ronbeaux50's Avatar


 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 1,559
You be right BW. Torch is the only way to go. Been doing it for years. If you got some lit coals and some vents to open and close, who needs a manual anyways.
__________________
The fight ain't over until the winner says it is.

Backwoods Party, Bubba Keg, Primo XL Oval, Ole Grandad, Mini BGE, Bradly Original Smoker, and a Weber kettle.
ronbeaux50 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2008, 03:03 PM   #25
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
bigwheel's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Foat Wuth
Posts: 9,951
My goodness..you is about the rightest person I ever met. I only mentioned the owner's manuel to try to keep them folks from chunking 2 inch tinfoil hair balls into the water pan. Now whuts up with that? I did not mean to start out chasing rabbit trails (that whut preachers say when their sermon gets off topic...or so I heard one time about Gulflite. Actually ya know african americkans use it profusely and as everybody know they make the best bbq in the world. We might have to discuss this topic sometime.

bigwheel


Quote:
Originally Posted by ronbeaux50
You be right BW. Torch is the only way to go. Been doing it for years. If you got some lit coals and some vents to open and close, who needs a manual anyways.
bigwheel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2008, 05:54 PM   #26
Cooker
 
WildFireEric's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Sterling, VA
Posts: 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn White
if you're having trouble gettin/keepin temp up ditch the water, ya don't need the heat sink.

use foil balls covered with foil, air gap helps keep the drippins from burnin

could use sand covered with foil ... or a clay pot saucer stuck in the pan covered with foil

ditchin water was the best thing I've done .. .I shoulda listened to Rempe years ago
I use sand (covered with foil) in both my WSMs and generally have good success. The wind and no wind break is what gave me problems. I'll look into the suggestions that everyone mentioned. Once the wind died, the temps soared, so I know that was all it was. I listened to Bill the Grill Guy last year mention sand. It's done wonders for my turkeys.
__________________
Eric aka The Pig
WildFireEric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2008, 07:20 PM   #27
BBQ Central Pro


 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 791
yeah, wind can be a real bitch, I got the bullet smoking jacket for when I need it ... guys spend $$ and time and build all sorts of fancy enclosures ... I dunno, not really my thing ... I'd be more into getting a buddy to torch cut a steel drum for it.

If you don't like science stuff and math hurts your head don't read any more of this post!!!

Another reason to quit using water is to save money on charcoal ... I did something like this for that other board, I wondered why everyone kept saying water was a heat sink:

When you put charcoal in the WSM you have a set amount of energy to cook with, but keeping water hot costs energy, that's why it's called a heat sink. Some googling came up with this:

Water cannot exceed the temp of it's boiling point (in liquid form) unless pressure is applied (superheating) but it's behaviour is to absorb heat until it reaches boiling. My crude estimate for easy figuring is it takes 1500BTUs to heat the water in the standard water pan to boiling point (10lbs of water * 150F) (1 US gallon of water is 8.3lbs).

Once at the boiling point, more energy is used when water transforms to steam. This is called the Latent Heat of Vaporization and in the case of water it is 970 BTU's per pound. So, chalk up another another 9700 BTUs per every 5 hours (for 10lbs of water to completely evaporate).

Quote:
All combustible materials have a BTU rating. For instance, propane has about 15,000 BTUs per pound. Charcoal has about 9,000 BTUs per pound and wood (dry) has about 7,000 BTUs per pound. This gives you an idea of how much fuel you'd need to, say, cook something.
Taken From Here

If you put 10# of charcoal in the WSM, it only has 90,000 BTUs of fuel to use during the cook. How much of that energy did we use lighting up the charcoal? This is one of the reasons why MM or torch light gives such a long burn from a ring ... we didn't blow 1/4+ of it in the chimney.

We loose heat out of the top, radiated heat from the exterior surface, heat when we 'take a peek' ... in the case of wind, we are fighting to keep temp up we don't don't need to spend that energy turning water to steam.

Just say your cook was 10 hours, you emptied the water pan twice then rough guess based on those numbers says over 25% of the charcoal you put in was spent keeping the water boiling and turning it into steam. That pisses me off when I'm using $20/bag lump (not so much when using cheap briqs which is most of the time).

I put a warning up there but I'm still 'specting to take some flack for this post
Shawn White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-18-2008, 10:57 PM   #28
Cooker
 
WildFireEric's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Sterling, VA
Posts: 292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn White
yeah, wind can be a real bitch, I got the bullet smoking jacket for when I need it ... guys spend $$ and time and build all sorts of fancy enclosures ... I dunno, not really my thing ... I'd be more into getting a buddy to torch cut a steel drum for it.

If you don't like science stuff and math hurts your head don't read any more of this post!!!

Another reason to quit using water is to save money on charcoal ... I did something like this for that other board, I wondered why everyone kept saying water was a heat sink:

When you put charcoal in the WSM you have a set amount of energy to cook with, but keeping water hot costs energy, that's why it's called a heat sink. Some googling came up with this:

Water cannot exceed the temp of it's boiling point (in liquid form) unless pressure is applied (superheating) but it's behaviour is to absorb heat until it reaches boiling. My crude estimate for easy figuring is it takes 1500BTUs to heat the water in the standard water pan to boiling point (10lbs of water * 150F) (1 US gallon of water is 8.3lbs).

Once at the boiling point, more energy is used when water transforms to steam. This is called the Latent Heat of Vaporization and in the case of water it is 970 BTU's per pound. So, chalk up another another 9700 BTUs per every 5 hours (for 10lbs of water to completely evaporate).

Quote:
All combustible materials have a BTU rating. For instance, propane has about 15,000 BTUs per pound. Charcoal has about 9,000 BTUs per pound and wood (dry) has about 7,000 BTUs per pound. This gives you an idea of how much fuel you'd need to, say, cook something.
Taken From Here

If you put 10# of charcoal in the WSM, it only has 90,000 BTUs of fuel to use during the cook. How much of that energy did we use lighting up the charcoal? This is one of the reasons why MM or torch light gives such a long burn from a ring ... we didn't blow 1/4+ of it in the chimney.

We loose heat out of the top, radiated heat from the exterior surface, heat when we 'take a peek' ... in the case of wind, we are fighting to keep temp up we don't don't need to spend that energy turning water to steam.

Just say your cook was 10 hours, you emptied the water pan twice then rough guess based on those numbers says over 25% of the charcoal you put in was spent keeping the water boiling and turning it into steam. That pisses me off when I'm using $20/bag lump (not so much when using cheap briqs which is most of the time).

I put a warning up there but I'm still 'specting to take some flack for this post
So, all things being equal: I can either use sand and regular briqs or use water in my pan and have to use lump (lump provides more heat than regular, right?) Thus cheaper to not run water. Now you just need the Pro Water people to speak up about the benefits of water (more stable max temp, more moisture, more flavor if putting juice and seasonings in pan)?

I appreciate the science lesson even if your day job isn't to fly rockets
__________________
Eric aka The Pig
WildFireEric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2008, 01:14 AM   #29
BBQ Central Pro


 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 791
Quote:
I can either use sand and regular briqs or use water in my pan and have to use lump (lump provides more heat than regular, right?)
You don't have to use water with lump either ... the point is you can either run a bit smaller fire because it isn't being wasted keeping water hot and turning it to steam, which saves you charcoal in the end, or you added a turbo ... you can turn up the heat a bit more if needed due to wind/cold.

No idea how much energy sand takes, the ones I mentioned take less to be sure. A typical cook for me was both grates loaded, a brinkmann pan full, vents 100% averaging about 215F grate. Now I can run 250F grate on say 33% vents with no water. Ya temps fluctuate a bit, not like 100 or anything. I can't tell a difference with no steam.
Shawn White is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2008, 03:16 AM   #30
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
Pigs On The Wing BBQ's Avatar


 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Akron New York
Posts: 6,922
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn White
Quote:
I can either use sand and regular briqs or use water in my pan and have to use lump (lump provides more heat than regular, right?)
You don't have to use water with lump either ... the point is you can either run a bit smaller fire because it isn't being wasted keeping water hot and turning it to steam, which saves you charcoal in the end, or you added a turbo ... you can turn up the heat a bit more if needed due to wind/cold.

No idea how much energy sand takes, the ones I mentioned take less to be sure. A typical cook for me was both grates loaded, a brinkmann pan full, vents 100% averaging about 215F grate. Now I can run 250F grate on say 33% vents with no water. Ya temps fluctuate a bit, not like 100 or anything. I can't tell a difference with no steam.
Plus you get a better flavor with that meat dripping into the fire pan over hot coals!

Pigs
__________________

__________________
The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that,
you've got it made. -Groucho Marx (1890-1977)
www.oinktoberfest.com
Team Gruber Mister BBQ
KCBS Citified Judge 8282
Tomorrow is just your future yesterday
Pigs On The Wing BBQ is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off








Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.