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Old 01-29-2007, 02:53 PM   #1
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Burnt Ends

I'm working on my brisket. Specifically, I'm working on Burnt Ends. What is the process for producing great Burnt Ends? Does it include another rub, sauce, or spice?

Good Q!

Jack
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Old 01-29-2007, 03:19 PM   #2
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Cook brisket until flat is done. Separate point from flat and return point to cooker for 2 - 4 hrs. Chop and toss with you favorite sauce. Either serve at once or place in pan with more sauce and return to cooker until sauce is hot and time to serve.
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Old 01-29-2007, 03:54 PM   #3
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Thanks Finney,

Would you re-season the point before you put it back on the cooker? Do you recomend heavy, light, or no smoke at all? What style of sauce do you believe burnt ends should be soaked in? Should I sauce/glaze the point at anytime during the 2-4 hours?

Good Q!

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Old 01-29-2007, 03:56 PM   #4
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Is it ok to put the point back on the pit after resting with the flat intact?
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Old 01-29-2007, 04:17 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cliff H.
Is it ok to put the point back on the pit after resting with the flat intact?
Yes.
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Old 01-29-2007, 04:24 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack W.
Thanks Finney,

Would you re-season the point before you put it back on the cooker? Do you recomend heavy, light, or no smoke at all? What style of sauce do you believe burnt ends should be soaked in? Should I sauce/glaze the point at anytime during the 2-4 hours?

Good Q!

Jack
I would reseason at least the area where it was attached to the flat and cook with that side up.

You are basically cooking most of the moisture out of the point to get burnt ends, so the flavors will be intensified during the process. The sauce softens the meat back up some.

I've tasted your brisket sauce and that should be dandy. Or you could use some Stubbs or SBR's.
Or dare I say it..... Cattleman's No, I can't say that.
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Old 01-29-2007, 05:21 PM   #7
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Thanks again Finney,

If I'm planning on making burnt ends rather than chopped beef from the deckel, do you still recomend using foil during the cook?

I'm also interested in the hot and fast brisket technique and I'm questioning whether the burnt ends from that technique are still as "good" as those that can be made from a low and slow process?

Good Q!

Jack
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Old 01-29-2007, 06:47 PM   #8
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[quote=craig castille]
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Jack W.":195rof6j
Thanks again Finney,

If I'm planning on making burnt ends rather than chopped beef from the deckel, do you still recomend using foil during the cook?

I'm also interested in the hot and fast brisket technique and I'm questioning whether the burnt ends from that technique are still as "good" as those that can be made from a low and slow process?

Good Q!

Jack
No difference on the burnt ends....just figure 1-2 hours tops if cooking at 350 lid.[/quote:195rof6j]

350 lid

Good Q!

Jack
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Old 01-29-2007, 07:49 PM   #9
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The key to 'good' burnt ends is to make sure all the fat is rendered. Too many Q joints here who use real brisket points tend to be in a rush for some reason and they are real fatty, HUGE disappointment since they cost an arm and a leg.

As far as re-seasoning them, I would just say a good Q sauce will give them the flavor you want, no need to add more rub to 'em.
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Old 01-30-2007, 06:26 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack W.
Thanks again Finney,

If I'm planning on making burnt ends rather than chopped beef from the deckel, do you still recomend using foil during the cook?

I'm also interested in the hot and fast brisket technique and I'm questioning whether the burnt ends from that technique are still as "good" as those that can be made from a low and slow process?

Good Q!

Jack
Did I recommend using foil? LOL Just kidding.

Well, to answer your question.... 100% of you brisket cook is trying make sure that the flat turns out tender and jucy. So do whatever it takes to reach that end. Making burnt ends is a secondary process anyway and should be treated as such.

The hot and fast technique interests me also and will try it one day soon. But even then, the flat is the part you have to worry about and should focus on. If the flat is jucy and tender, you can cook the point longer to get more fat out of it.
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Old 01-30-2007, 06:34 AM   #11
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When I do burnt endz...I always open the WSM vents 100% on the bottom. Seems weird, I know but it works and produces good endz!
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Old 01-30-2007, 06:39 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteerCrazy
The key to 'good' burnt ends is to make sure all the fat is rendered. Too many Q joints here who use real brisket points tend to be in a rush for some reason and they are real fatty, HUGE disappointment since they cost an arm and a leg.

As far as re-seasoning them, I would just say a good Q sauce will give them the flavor you want, no need to add more rub to 'em.
Dan is exactly right! There's alot of fat in the point that should be rendered way down.

Jack, as far as reseasoning the point, use your judgement. The point already has natural wonderful flavor itself and you dont' really want to over season and take away from that. You just want to kind of enhance the natural flavor. I typically remove the point from the flat priot to cooking in the first place. That way the point and the flat get 100% rub coverage and there's a nice thick fat cap still left on the flat. Once the flat is done and resting, I'll keep the point on the cooker for as long as 4 additional hours to complete the rendering process. Then chop, add rub to taste and toss (not drown) in sauce and simmer for a few minutes.
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Old 01-30-2007, 11:14 AM   #13
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Hi Yall,

I've cooked briskits & butts both ways fast & hot (325 to350), as well as low & slow (225 to 250) You get better bark & burned ends a the higher temps of both methods. My crazy Bro in law cooks his briskits at 400 for 30 minutes then 200 till 195 internal, his come out good too. His method
give kinda a burnt end style bark & real juicy inside. I think he learned from the Texas open pit school of Qin. I belive as long as ya cook with smoke & fire it really don't matter what the method is as long as it tastes good & it aint tough & dried out. I don't like shoe leather
The only diference I can tell between hot & fast & low & slow is fuel consumption, Keepin a good sized smoker above 325 uses about twice the fuel. & don't forgit wind & outdoor temps they can cause neg. & pos. effects on fuel too.
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Old 01-30-2007, 02:24 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Finney
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack W.
Thanks again Finney,

If I'm planning on making burnt ends rather than chopped beef from the deckel, do you still recomend using foil during the cook?

I'm also interested in the hot and fast brisket technique and I'm questioning whether the burnt ends from that technique are still as "good" as those that can be made from a low and slow process?

Good Q!

Jack
Did I recommend using foil? LOL Just kidding.

Well, to answer your question.... 100% of you brisket cook is trying make sure that the flat turns out tender and jucy. So do whatever it takes to reach that end. Making burnt ends is a secondary process anyway and should be treated as such.

The hot and fast technique interests me also and will try it one day soon. But even then, the flat is the part you have to worry about and should focus on. If the flat is jucy and tender, you can cook the point longer to get more fat out of it.
I guess I did get a little ahead of my self there. Do you recomend using foil during a brisket cook that is pointed toward producing great burnt ends?

When I inject my brisket I focus on the flat, since I generally make chopped marinated beef out of the point. Do you think that injection would make the flavors too intense and throw the profile too far out?

Good Q!

Jack
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Old 01-30-2007, 03:01 PM   #15
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[quote=Jack W.]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finney
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Jack W.":1pxhc23b
Thanks again Finney,

If I'm planning on making burnt ends rather than chopped beef from the deckel, do you still recomend using foil during the cook?

I'm also interested in the hot and fast brisket technique and I'm questioning whether the burnt ends from that technique are still as "good" as those that can be made from a low and slow process?

Good Q!

Jack
Did I recommend using foil? LOL Just kidding.

Well, to answer your question.... 100% of you brisket cook is trying make sure that the flat turns out tender and jucy. So do whatever it takes to reach that end. Making burnt ends is a secondary process anyway and should be treated as such.

The hot and fast technique interests me also and will try it one day soon. But even then, the flat is the part you have to worry about and should focus on. If the flat is jucy and tender, you can cook the point longer to get more fat out of it.
I guess I did get a little ahead of my self there. Do you recomend using foil during a brisket cook that is pointed toward producing great burnt ends?

When I inject my brisket I focus on the flat, since I generally make chopped marinated beef out of the point. Do you think that injection would make the flavors too intense and throw the profile too far out?

Good Q!

Jack[/quote:1pxhc23b]

As a wise man once told me, "Boy, you're over thinking this"... "it's BBQ"
stupid wise man

I would do everything just like you do it normally. I know what your injection is and you should be fine. Focus on the flat then worry about your burnt ends. I'm not going to debate foil or no foil during the cook right now (I'm saving that), so if you do... do. If you don't... don't.
If you want the burnt ends done about the same time as the flat finishes resting then separate the point from the falt when you remove from the cooker and put the flat back on the cooker. Or do as Larry does and separate before you cook. I've never done this but it seems to work well for him.
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Old 01-31-2007, 06:29 AM   #16
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[quote=Bryan S][quote="Jack W.":1c9prkbd]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finney
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Jack W.":1c9prkbd
Thanks again Finney,

If I'm planning on making burnt ends rather than chopped beef from the deckel, do you still recomend using foil during the cook?

I'm also interested in the hot and fast brisket technique and I'm questioning whether the burnt ends from that technique are still as "good" as those that can be made from a low and slow process?

Good Q!

Jack
Did I recommend using foil?

I guess I did get a little ahead of my self there. Do you recomend using foil during a brisket cook that is pointed toward producing great burnt ends?

When I inject my brisket I focus on the flat, since I generally make chopped marinated beef out of the point. Do you think that injection would make the flavors too intense and throw the profile too far out?

Good Q!

Jack
I like Larry seperate the flat from the point before cooking, because in my book it's all about the flat. Yes i do foil the flat when cooking, so it comes out tender and Oh so juicy. Why, because it gives me better results, YMMV. I usually give the point to the cats, they like i hate it. And sorry for butting in on this thread. [/quote:1c9prkbd][/quote:1c9prkbd]

Hey Bryan,

Thanks for you input.

Please don't think you're butting in on the thread. There are many ways to produce great results in barbecue. The great thing about this hobby is that I get to try the different methods of cooking a piece of meat and choose which one suits me.

Anyone else?

Good Q!

Jack
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Old 01-31-2007, 06:37 AM   #17
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Old 01-31-2007, 06:42 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryan S
I like Larry seperate the flat from the point before cooking, because in my book it's all about the flat. Yes i do foil the flat when cooking, so it comes out tender and Oh so juicy. Why, because it gives me better results, YMMV. I usually give the point to the cats, they like i hate it. And sorry for butting in on this thread.
Brian,
I have a friend that trims all of his brisket points of as much fat as possilbe, then freezes them until there is enough to grind into burger. He says they are the best burgers you'll ever eat. You may want to give that a shot with your points next time rather than feeding them to the cats. If I had a grinder, I'd sure give it a try!
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Old 01-31-2007, 06:46 AM   #19
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[quote=Larry Wolfe]
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Bryan S":382iqs4q
I like Larry seperate the flat from the point before cooking, because in my book it's all about the flat. Yes i do foil the flat when cooking, so it comes out tender and Oh so juicy. Why, because it gives me better results, YMMV. I usually give the point to the cats, they like i hate it. And sorry for butting in on this thread.
Brian,
I have a friend that trims all of his brisket points of as much fat as possilbe, then freezes them until there is enough to grind into burger. He says they are the best burgers you'll ever eat. You may want to give that a shot with your points next time rather than feeding them to the cats. If I had a grinder, I'd sure give it a try![/quote:382iqs4q]

That's still gonna be a greasy burger....... damn tasty........ but greasy.
note to self: Make brisket "point" burgers.
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Old 01-31-2007, 06:48 AM   #20
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[quote=Finney]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Wolfe
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Bryan S":2incwsmu
I like Larry seperate the flat from the point before cooking, because in my book it's all about the flat. Yes i do foil the flat when cooking, so it comes out tender and Oh so juicy. Why, because it gives me better results, YMMV. I usually give the point to the cats, they like i hate it. And sorry for butting in on this thread.
Brian,
I have a friend that trims all of his brisket points of as much fat as possilbe, then freezes them until there is enough to grind into burger. He says they are the best burgers you'll ever eat. You may want to give that a shot with your points next time rather than feeding them to the cats. If I had a grinder, I'd sure give it a try!
That's still gonna be a greasy burger....... damn tasty........ but greasy.
note to self: Make brisket "point" burgers.[/quote:2incwsmu]

I think the same thing, but fat = flavor, so it's gotta be good! Eat it with an extra paper towel!!
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