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Old 07-26-2011, 10:38 AM   #1
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Brisket help.

I've got a brisket in the FE. It is at 165* degrees. When I went to check temps the thermopen practically melted into the flat. Is it possible this thing is done at 165*? I've never seen this happen. Thanks.
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Old 07-26-2011, 10:50 AM   #2
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Re: Brisket help.

I would check the thermopen. I dont see hoe it could be done at that temp. If thermopen is accurate, I would say you hit a fat vein. But that is just my opinion...
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Old 07-26-2011, 11:06 AM   #3
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Re: Brisket help.

Quote:
Originally Posted by swampsauce
I would check the thermopen. I dont see hoe it could be done at that temp. If thermopen is accurate, I would say you hit a fat vein. But that is just my opinion...

Well PeeDee. I'm an idiot. I just went out to check and make sure I wasn't in a fat vein and guess what, I decided last night to cook these ones fat cap up. That would splain the melting in part. Thanks for the help.

HAs anyone ever noticed a difference cooking fat cap up or down? I know a guy who swears by fat cap up. This is only the second time i've tried it. thanks.
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Old 07-26-2011, 01:13 PM   #4
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Re: Brisket help.

I do em all fat down. That leaves the lean side more prone to get crusted up and get some good flavor in it and gives an area to apply mop/sop. If you put the fat up it sorta keeps the lean part in a sheltered position and never does get itself barked up much. Now some of this depends on the heat distribution of the pit. My normal routine is heat source on the bottom and then a water pan which makes the bottom of the brisket catch mostly real high moisture laden air and dont develop much character. Now if a person wants to start it fat up and flip it after a couple of hours..I dont have any problemos with that. Normally when a brisket passes the poke test at 165 it means the poker is drunk
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Old 07-26-2011, 07:12 PM   #5
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Re: Brisket help.

Don't really have my brisket technique down for the new cooker, but I'm trimming my briskets pretty close these days to get rub, ring and bark on both sides.

If you inject and wrap, you don't have to worry about drying out, too much.

Last brisket I made, and the first in the Fatboy, was a packer cut CAB, fairly close trim, but not wrap and cooked without injection or mopping. It was cooked at 250 until it stalled, then I raised the temp to 275.

The flat was okay -- but just okay. Not dry, but not real moist either.

It appears the Fatboy's water pan and overall tightness help, but not quite enough to dispense with the tricks entirely.

Next brisket -- and I've got another one just like the other one wet aging -- will be pumped and wrapped.

Speaking of cookers, I find a lot of low and slow is very equipment dependent. If your rig is drafty, has some preferred temp, isn't well tuned, or whatever... you're going to have to adjust. Sometimes you do that in how you prep the meat, sometimes in which little gags you do or don't use, and sometimes in your cooking techniques themselves.

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Old 07-27-2011, 01:22 PM   #6
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Re: Brisket help.

Well thanks for that input sir. Very informative. Old bohunk fella from down in the Hill Country I have cooked with and against a few times in the past is totally anti brisket fat. Time he gets done trimming on a packer there aint "none" in sight. Always comes out with a superlative product. Now he do wrap and is highly mop/sop oriented. He has a secret one which he makes up in gallon glass jugs. He will give you all you want just dont axe for the reicpe Its a waste of breath.
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Old 07-27-2011, 05:35 PM   #7
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Re: Brisket help.

Big,

My last cooker -- a Bar B Chef offset -- got me off mopping. It was as much a NO PEEKING rig as possible. Open the lid and you lost all the humidity, so no matter what you did to the meat what you mopped on the meat when the top was up, it ended up making everything drier. True for a great many smokers, especially the beginners' models, so I recommend against mopping to people starting out.

Not sure if that's true for the Fatboy or not. Lots of fooling around to do, some of it possibly requiring beer.

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Old 07-27-2011, 05:57 PM   #8
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Re: Brisket help.

A brisket is 'done' when it's tender, not by a specific temperature or if it's cooked fat up or fat down. IMO, the less you mess with a brisket, the better it will turn out. Cook in the smoke, fat up until it's formed a nice bark. Then foil and continue to cook until tender.
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Old 07-27-2011, 06:17 PM   #9
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Re: Brisket help.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigwheel
I do em all fat down. That leaves the lean side more prone to get crusted up and get some good flavor in it and gives an area to apply mop/sop. If you put the fat up it sorta keeps the lean part in a sheltered position and never does get itself barked up much. Now some of this depends on the heat distribution of the pit. My normal routine is heat source on the bottom and then a water pan which makes the bottom of the brisket catch mostly real high moisture laden air and dont develop much character. Now if a person wants to start it fat up and flip it after a couple of hours..I dont have any problemos with that. Normally when a brisket passes the poke test at 165 it means the poker is drunk
I learned this method from a retarted......'scuse me .......a retired public servant person a few years back. The mop was and is still the best when I cook at home in the crib....so to speak.
I wonder whatever happened to him?
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Old 07-28-2011, 12:07 PM   #10
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Re: Brisket help.

Well I was taught many moons ago that door fanning made tough meat so I certainly see your point especially on top opening offset type cookers with no additional moisture being introduced through a water pan. I dont think you will run into that particular issue with the Fatboy. Dont it have outward opening doors and a water pan? My big pit is thusly equipped and its a total different ball game from a top loader. Heat dont drop much when the door is open and what little humidity might be lost is quickly replaced from the water pan stores. Judicious mopping with small amounts of the right mop which is kept hot (where it dont slow down the cooking process) adds some great layers of flavor and improves the color. Now speaking strictly brisket here. That is about all I bother to mop.

Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze
Big,

My last cooker -- a Bar B Chef offset -- got me off mopping. It was as much a NO PEEKING rig as possible. Open the lid and you lost all the humidity, so no matter what you did to the meat what you mopped on the meat when the top was up, it ended up making everything drier. True for a great many smokers, especially the beginners' models, so I recommend against mopping to people starting out.

Not sure if that's true for the Fatboy or not. Lots of fooling around to do, some of it possibly requiring beer.

BDL
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