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Old 04-09-2005, 08:17 PM   #1
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Brisket for Mexican food

My wife's family is having a get together and they want me to smoke a brisket. But they don't want to eat it with BBQ sauce on it, they want to use the meat to make some mexican food. It does sound good, plus any chance I get to smoke some meat I will do it. But then I got to thinking, since this brisket is going to become mexican food, should I change the rub I usually use? Maybe something a little spicier? Should I use a different mop sauce?

Any ideas or thoughts you guys have would be greatly appreciated! :biggrin:
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Old 04-09-2005, 08:31 PM   #2
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sounds cool ddog ... depending on what they are doing with the brisket you might want to skip the rub altogether, use just S&P, or maybe try a package of taco seasoning

Or you could make your own custom rub ... I would go heavy on pepper, cumin, granulated garlic, paprika, hot chile powder, some hickory smoked salt, maybe even some ground basil and/or oregano.

Look at other rub recipes to guestimate proportions for your custom rub if you go that route.

for your mop, maybe skip it the first time around or add some of your rub to some cider vinegar and a bit of worcestershire & red wine

mix in a bit of fresh chopped cilantro leaves to the chopped brisket? mix in some shallots sauteed in butter?
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Old 04-09-2005, 10:34 PM   #3
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Shawn's custom rub above is a good idea. I'd probably add onion powder, coriander, and marjoram to that. I don't usually mop but your question got me thinking: I might consider a dried pepper or two (like a New Mexico and/or a Pasilla) re-hydrated in hot water, seeds removed then pureed with flat beer and a little beef stock with a pinch of sugar and a little of the rub. Just a thought.
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Old 04-09-2005, 11:17 PM   #4
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Thanks Kevin, I meant to add the onion powder but I am not familiar with marjoram or coriander ... sounds cool

About the mop ddog, I think cider vinegar and/or red wine might help cut brisket fat a bit, but mainly, if you go custom rub I think you should try to get the rub RIGHT before adding a custom mop to the mix. Kevin's idea sounds intriguing too, but I don't have much mop sauce experience. I think the mop should be complimentary to the rub, implying the rub recipe is decided.
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Old 04-10-2005, 10:49 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn White
... if you go custom rub I think you should try to get the rub RIGHT before adding a custom mop to the mix. .
Good point.

Marjoram, btw, looks similar to some oreganos when growing but dries greener. It has an appealing sweetness and does not turn bitter during long cooks the way oregano and basil can. It is very common in many German sausage spice mixes, is wonderful in long-cooked tomato sauces (put the oregano and basil in near the end of cooking for best results), works with virtually any meat, and is also common in Middle East, French, and Slavic cuisines. Great on roasted potatoes, btw.

Coriander is actually the fruits (though they look like seeds) of the cilantro plant. In fact, till Mexican food became popular here, cilantro was referred to as coriander leaves. They taste nothing like cilantro. They have a warm, slightly citrus-y, kind of nutty flavor. They are essential in many Indian and Arabic spice blends, found in a variety of Mexican and European, and African dishes (not uncommon is sausages) and are a key spice ingredient in many commercial ketchups and Q sauces, though they don't have to say so on the label. Imo, best purchased whole then toasted lightly and ground for use.
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Old 04-11-2005, 08:27 AM   #6
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Fatz,

Its Durkee Kansas City Steak Seasoning. I use it on my steaks all the time and I love it! I never thought of using it on brisket! I bet it would be great! Thanks for the idea!!

:joy:
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