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Old 09-10-2007, 02:06 PM   #1
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Big Brisket question

I have a 10.5 lb. brisket on the cooker and have managed to keep the temp somewhere between 216 degress and 230 ish degrees. I am using an unmodified Chargriller and a side smoker box.

First off the cut was labeled "Bola De Res". I bought it at my nearest local market where I trust the meat and it is a Spanish Market. Maybe someone can translate this for me. I was told it was a brisket but it is rounder than what I have traditionally purchased.

What I am planning on doing is when it is done, wrapping it in foil and placing it in a cooler to rest for an hour.

Anyway what internal temp am I shooting for. My old meat thermometer says 170 is done. Is this the internal temp I need. I know with pork butt the 'done temp' is 160 ish but normally when I cook a butt the temp is higher as the meat is in the heat for so long.

I quess what I am asking is do I take it out at 170 degrees or do I shoot for longer times and possibly higher temps.

Also should I be basting it?

If none of this makes sense feel free to ask questions. I have a while before I reach 170.
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Old 09-10-2007, 02:38 PM   #2
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While I am still the new kid on the block by most standards, but here is what I would do personally...

Once the meat hits 165, I personally would double wrap it in foil with about a cup or so of apple juice. Then, monitor it until it hits about 190. Remove from the heat, wrap tightly in plastic wrap and then let it rest for 1 to 3 hours.

Save the drippings from the foil wrap to dribble over the slices when you are cutting.

-Chiles

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Old 09-10-2007, 02:56 PM   #3
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That sounds like a plan. I would not have thought of apple juice with beef. You are suggesting apple juice for beef? I am game especially if you do it this way.
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Old 09-10-2007, 03:25 PM   #4
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I was told to use apple juice by an old pro and can say that I was really happy with the results. One and a half cups is just enough to keep the meat moist and mix with the natural flavorings to produce a sweet broth inside the foil. By the way, that is why I double or even tripple wrap, I don't want any of that juice getting away becuase I am going to use it for re-heating.

Remember, I am a newby, and am learning as I go, but this advice certainly worked really well for me.

-Chiles
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Old 09-10-2007, 03:30 PM   #5
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Re: Big Brisket question

Quote:
Originally Posted by bknox
I have a 10.5 lb. brisket on the cooker and have managed to keep the temp somewhere between 216 degress and 230 ish degrees. I am using an unmodified Chargriller and a side smoker box.

First off the cut was labeled "Bola De Res". I bought it at my nearest local market where I trust the meat and it is a Spanish Market. Maybe someone can translate this for me. I was told it was a brisket but it is rounder than what I have traditionally purchased.

What I am planning on doing is when it is done, wrapping it in foil and placing it in a cooler to rest for an hour.

Anyway what internal temp am I shooting for. My old meat thermometer says 170 is done. Is this the internal temp I need. I know with pork butt the 'done temp' is 160 ish but normally when I cook a butt the temp is higher as the meat is in the heat for so long.

I quess what I am asking is do I take it out at 170 degrees or do I shoot for longer times and possibly higher temps.

Also should I be basting it?

If none of this makes sense feel free to ask questions. I have a while before I reach 170.
Bola De Res translates into Ball of Animal.

Post a pic of the meat out of the wrapper Bryan so we can see what it is.

If it is a brisket you can cook it two ways. #1 Cook between 225-250*, any lower is not necessary and you'll be cooking it forever and will take a chance or drying it out. Cook until you get an internal temp of 185* and try to slide a thermometer probe into the meat in several different spots. If it slides in with little resistance, double wrap it in foil and let rest 1-2 hours then open the foil and let cool for 15-20 minutes before slicing and slice against the grain. If there is resistance when inserting the probe, continue to cook and check every 5 degrees until you can insert the probe and it goes in like butter. Method #2, cook unfoiled until you get an internal temp of 165*, then foil and continue to cook following the same instructions above. Good luck, hope this helps!

PS, adding liquid is perfectly fine and a matter of choice. I don't do it because IMO it turns the brisket into more of a pot roast versus BBQ.
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Old 09-10-2007, 03:53 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bknox
That sounds like a plan. I would not have thought of apple juice with beef. You are suggesting apple juice for beef? I am game especially if you do it this way.
I like Dr. Pepper. It's a Texas thang. Where's Wheeler when you need him?

Jack
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Old 09-10-2007, 03:58 PM   #7
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Here is what I am cooking Larry.


I have only lived in the Cicero area since last October and quickly realized I should learn Spanish. Most of the markets I like are all Spanish but the guys at the meat couter generally do not speak English and the cuts are different than I was used to where we used to live.

Anyway, it does not look like the briskets I am used to but hopefully will be just as good. It is more of a "Ball" than the thick on one end cut I normally would call 'Brisket'.

"Ball of animal" soumds like the last rabbit I hit.

I think I am going to pass on the apple juice for now although I think it would be excellent with pork and think I have seen other BBQ Central members do this with butts.
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Old 09-10-2007, 04:07 PM   #8
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Holy cripes...that don't look like no brisket to me!
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Old 09-10-2007, 04:11 PM   #9
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How about it!!

It was in a thick plastic shrink bag and I thought maybe it would look more like a brisket when I unwrapped it. I was wrong.
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Old 09-10-2007, 04:13 PM   #10
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Should I be basting this beast?
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Old 09-10-2007, 04:19 PM   #11
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That looks more like a sirlion tip roast to me. Sometimes called a ball roast or knee roast. It should still make pretty good barbecue. It's gonna be lean though. Be careful.

Good Q!

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Old 09-10-2007, 04:27 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack W.
That looks more like a sirlion tip roast to me. Sometimes called a ball roast or knee roast. It should still make pretty good barbecue. It's gonna be lean though. Be careful.

Good Q!

Jack
Yes, I was going to say the exact thing! Looks like a sirloin something or another to me!

However I would cook it indirect in the 275* range until it hit 100* and then finish with a hot sear until it get's to your desired finished temperature, but don't cook till well done! Then let cool and slice really thin and make sammiches with thin sliced onion and horseradish. I would not even attempt to make BBQ with it, it's too lean.
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Old 09-10-2007, 04:38 PM   #13
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Not a brisket, but should cook fine. If you really want to BBQ it I would wrap at around an internal temp of about 140 and cook it to around 180 or maybe even less. This will take some feel to tell when the meat has the right tenderness. Good luck and I wouldn't worry too much, I can't imagine it messing up.
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Old 09-10-2007, 04:40 PM   #14
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CRAP! I am registering 149 degrees now. I am going to check it and possibly take it off and slow rest it.

I will post pix either way. Hopefully I have not ruined it.
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Old 09-10-2007, 04:41 PM   #15
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Quote:
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CRAP! I am registering 149 degrees now. I am going to check it and possibly take it off and slow rest it.

I will post pix either way. Hopefully I have not ruined it.
It's not ruined, but I wouldn't cook it anymore. But that's just my opinion.
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Old 09-10-2007, 05:10 PM   #16
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OK, well I went to foil it and had about 2 inches of foil left so I ran to the store, About half way there it began to rain. I am soaked but as I was wrapping it up I noticed it sure smelled fine.

Hopefully it will be tasty and not to dry, we will see.
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Old 09-10-2007, 05:12 PM   #17
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Larry I am going to let it rest in a cooler insulated with news paper for a couple of hours. Hopefully I will have pictures tomorrow that shows some success.

Thanks for all the help everybody. I think I can say I learned something today.
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Old 09-10-2007, 05:12 PM   #18
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I sent the picture to my buddy Steve aka "Ask A Butcher" and he says from the picture it looks like Ball Tip Roast (bottom sirloin). Here's some pic's and more info of some he did not too long ago.


http://askabutcher.proboards42.com/inde ... 1139838630
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Old 09-10-2007, 05:22 PM   #19
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That looks like the meat in question except the one I have is really big. Generally I would have cooked it over the weekend so I could eat lunch all week but my 'honey do' list allowed me no time.

Currently it is wrapped in foil in a cooler with paper insulating it. About 6:00 I will crack it open and see.

I need to find a butcher that speaks English. One time, in a hurry, I went to buy some small steak I ended up with goat. Don't get me wrong goat is great but the language barrier bites my *** sometimes.
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Old 09-10-2007, 06:12 PM   #20
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Bryan,

bola de res isn't brisket. It's from the round. Your picture looks like it was taken from the round primal near the sirloin and might be about half of the eye of round. Could also be part of the "cross rib" from the Chuck.

Brisket, in Spanish, is falda.

Whole pig and good brisket are the Holy Grails of barbecue. Neither is easy to do well. In one respect, brisket is more difficult, because it's easier to screw up and at any given time thousands of barbecuers are doing just that.

If you scroll down the threads under this (General Barbecue) heading, you'll see a thread titled Brisket Membrane. I've got a post in there called "Brisket by the Numbers." Please take a look at. It's not the only Tao of Brisket, but it is one of them. Follow the step by step instructions fairly closely and you'll end up with a good brisket -- better than almost any restaurant. Better yet, it will give you a foundation so you can try other things.

Personally, I don't like fruit juice with beef -- especially apple juice. Putting apple juice on or in anything associated with barbecue is a Southern thing. They can have it. Pork likes to be cooked in and with sweet, beef does not.

If you decide to foil (which in your case is a very good idea) it's also a good idea to put a little liquid in the pack. Beer is good, if you happen to have one open. Red wine, ditto. Even a little of your finishing sauce (although it does add some sweet, at least it's "barbecue"). If you do go with beer, add some onions and peppers along with.

The "done" temperatures on your thermometer have nothing to do with the tough cuts most associated with barbecue. Pork shoulder (butt, picnic, or whole shoulder) should be removed from the smoker at no less than 190 (preferably 195) and allowed at least an hour rest. Brisket is normally done between 190 and 200, the difference depending on the length of the stall, and also allowed a long rest. At least two hours. The higher temperatures are necessary to force the protein molecules to untangle. Easier to remember is the barbecue phrase, "beyond done and into tender."

Other, inherently more tender cuts don't require that kind of cooking. For instance, I'd pull pork loin at 160 or a bit below, and beef rib at 130.

Considering the temp at which you pulled your roast, I think you got it right at about "well done," but before tender. My guess is that you're going to have to slice very thin for tenderness; and that "dipping" would return some juiciness.

You can make an "au jus" for beef dips by putting a little EVOO oil in a hot pan, adding some chopped garlic, and when the garlic softens a 1/2 cup of wine. Bring to a boil, reduce by half, then add a can of beef stock and 2 tbs of Worcestershire sauce, and reduce by about 1/4 (a skosh less than the can). You'll barely taste the garlic, wine or Worcestershire. Instead, they'll amplify the beef.

I'd think you could take a smoked round or chuck all the way past 180 for "barbecue." Test for tender by sticking a fork in the meat and turning it ("twist test"). If it turns, the meat is done. Even if you pull the meat earlier you can solve the toughness problems by slicing very, very thin. If the meat is so overdone it shreds, serve it for tacos or on a french roll and say you did it on purpose. On tacos it's "ropa vieja," On a french roll it's "debris." Look 'em right in the eye and say you called all three rails. Don't laugh.

Rich
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