Baltimore Pit Beef ...does anyone know - BBQ Central

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Old 05-12-2009, 03:18 PM   #1
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Baltimore Pit Beef ...does anyone know

how they do it?
When I lived near Baltimore, many fund raisers were billed as a 'bull roast'. From what I recall they used concrete forms to make a big pit, put in some charcoal and let it burn. They would 'roast' large hunks of meat, which ususally had rods about 1/3, 2/3 the way down to hold the meat above the pit and so it could get turned. It ususally took 2 people to handle the big hunks.

My questions are: What cut was it? a whole round? A whole top round? a whole bottom round?
what temp were the pits? do they do it low and slow? or is it higher then that? 400-500?

I remember that the meat came out with a nice bark (great burnt ends) but the middle was rare. They ususally used electric slicers to cut the meat for sammy's.

anyone do this or see this done? St Marys HS AA (Annapolis) used to cater alot of events and did this, but I;ve lost my connections to ask them.

Any thoughts appreicated!! ( I may have asked this yesterday, but don't see the post, sorry if it is redundant)
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Old 05-12-2009, 09:16 PM   #2
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I will use the search function to find the Baltimore pit beef recipe. If that dont work plug the phrase into goggle. It aint worth a *hit. Not sure why anybody want to make it..but then I never raised any any yankees so they could think different than you and I.

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Old 05-12-2009, 09:50 PM   #3
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Here be a site I found with some info an a recipe, ain't sure ifin it be what yer lookin fer er not.

http://www.nytimes.com/2000/06/28/dinin ... nted=print
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Old 05-13-2009, 04:49 AM   #4
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Use the search here and enter Pit Beef.

Typically it is a top round cust about 2-3" thick that is grilled direct. Sliced thin against the grain and then piled high on a kaiser roll. Topped with horseradish sauce, tomato, lettuce and onion (or none of that if you prefer)
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Old 05-13-2009, 05:29 AM   #5
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HERE's how I do pit beef. You'll have to scroll past the London broil part of the post.
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Old 05-13-2009, 06:47 AM   #6
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Re: Baltimore Pit Beef ...does anyone know

Quote:
Originally Posted by sluggo
how they do it?
When I lived near Baltimore, many fund raisers were billed as a 'bull roast'. From what I recall they used concrete forms to make a big pit, put in some charcoal and let it burn. They would 'roast' large hunks of meat, which ususally had rods about 1/3, 2/3 the way down to hold the meat above the pit and so it could get turned. It ususally took 2 people to handle the big hunks.

....

anyone do this or see this done? St Marys HS AA (Annapolis) used to cater alot of events and did this, but I;ve lost my connections to ask them.

Any thoughts appreicated!! ( I may have asked this yesterday, but don't see the post, sorry if it is redundant)
A couple of years ago our church had a beef bbq. The guy who ran it had a "pit" made out of sheet steel - just a 4-sided box that sat on the gravel in a parking lot. He cooked large beef roasts that were skewered on two long stainless steel rods - several roasts on each set of rods. The rods then were laid across the top of the metal box, so the meat was about 3 feet above the level of the coals. We lit charcoal in a separate pit (made from a few concrete blocks) and shoveled it into the cooking pit as needed. Every so often we turned the meat by picking up the two rods and flipping them over. I don't know what cut of meat he cooked - I was basically just a gofer that ran errands. I would say this was "low and slow" because it did take several hours to cook. The results were pretty good - I pigged out, and got to take home some of the leftovers since I was on the cooking crew.
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Old 05-13-2009, 08:01 AM   #7
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the key is slicing thinly
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Old 05-13-2009, 08:45 AM   #8
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I know thats right Cappy. Person gonna need a commercial slicer to get it thin enough to make that pit beef tender enough to eat. When you can read a newspaper through one of the slices thats about right.

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Old 05-13-2009, 10:20 AM   #9
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thanks guys!!

thanks guys!!
I did an internet search and found the NY times article as well, but then I thought I'd ask here because I know you guys are pros and serious about this stuff, plus I've always gotten good tips here in the past!!

Larry Wolfe- thanks, looks like for home I may try it that way. I thought about using the rotaisarre (sp?) on my grill as well,, with the temp 300-400.

Larry D- this is exactly what I remember the 'bull roasts' in Baltimore doing. I'd like to try it for a big crowd, but don't really know what cut they were ordering. I do remember they had commercial slicer's but they were taking the meat right from the pit and slicing it, no time in the cooler from what I saw.
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Old 05-13-2009, 04:28 PM   #10
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I've had these a number of times at functions. Usually they appeared to be about 15 pounds and had someone professionally carving. Very, Very good.

http://www.peoplearoundbama.com/cookboo ... iprnd.html
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