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Old 11-24-2013, 06:09 PM   #1
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Greetings from the Ontario

Hi guys/gals,

I'm new here and I'm looking forward to improving my BBQing skills. It's just too bad I didn't find this when the weather was warmer. I guess in a few months I'll be able to tear-up the Q after gaining some knowledge.

Have a nice day everyone,
John ( Rokit6 )
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Old 11-24-2013, 09:02 PM   #2
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Welcome to The Forum John good to have you here!
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Old 11-25-2013, 03:55 PM   #3
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Thanks Buzz,

I'm looking forward to some good eating!

John
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Old 11-25-2013, 08:15 PM   #4
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Welcome, sir! Winter bbqing can be fun too, With a windblock and some whiskey!
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Old 11-25-2013, 08:20 PM   #5
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Hi Boozer,

You have a point my good man. LOL
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Old 11-25-2013, 08:28 PM   #6
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Haha, then again Ontario might be a bit colder than Nebraska. But once it's below 20 f, (or -10 c) does it really matter?
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Old 11-25-2013, 08:35 PM   #7
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Haha, then again Ontario might be a bit colder than Nebraska. But once it's below 20 f, (or -10 c) does it really matter?
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Old 11-25-2013, 08:42 PM   #8
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Boozer,

True enough but fortunately we only seem to get the frigid temperatures ( between -25 and -30 for about a week or two inside of January and February. other then that it's really not as bad as you'd think. In fact there are places in Michigan that are much further north then I am.

I'm wondering, does the outside colder temperature have much of an affect on barbecuing? Will it affect cooking times or how the meat turns out?
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Old 11-25-2013, 09:14 PM   #9
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Yes and no. Fire management is a bit more challenging. You'll burn more wood (unless you have an insulated smoker. Naturally you will be less inclined to stay outside and watch it the whole time, and the wind is a factor as well. At least around here the winter wind is out of the north, rather than the south or west. As long as you can maintain your temp at 225-275 or whatever temp you like to cook at, time shouldn't be affected.
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Old 11-25-2013, 09:27 PM   #10
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Oh, and a couple of other things, opening your smoker is a much bigger deal in the winter. Dont do it except for to take pics for us! Lolz. If you are using a n electric smoker like a bges, they don't work in cold weather. I've heard that the bradley does.
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Old 11-25-2013, 09:30 PM   #11
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The wind can be pretty strong where I am as well. I'll probably end up trying. I think it will be hard for me to hold off until spring. ha ha

Thanks for the info.
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Old 11-25-2013, 09:36 PM   #12
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All I do is just turn my smoker so that the intake vent is downwind, and set up a wind block.
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Old 11-25-2013, 10:05 PM   #13
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I was thinking about it and went outside to look around. I think I may just have the perfect spot for it. My smoker is kind of high maintenance so I'll have to dress warm to baby sit it. It will be fun, cold but fun. I think I'll go with ribs, they don't take as long. I've read that pork ribs should be about 195 to 200 degree (F). Does that sound about right? What about a rub, should I go with just a dry rub or brine or what? What do you think would be best? I've made them before and they turned out pretty good but I didn't really know what I was doing, lol. Also should I put a liquid in with them? ( the smoker has a separate bowl for that ). I like spicy.
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Old 11-25-2013, 11:13 PM   #14
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Whoa, slow down dude. That's a lot of questions. Let's try to sort this out. First of all, yes the ribs should finish out at about 195. Most people don't believe in that, and stress that temp is too hard to gauge with ribs. There is some truth to this. This is the internal temp for finished ribs. Pit temp should be 275. I personally don't marinate or brine ribs either. Just a rub sealed in with mustard. You will get several different ideas and opinions on how to do ribs here. Ultimately you will use the advice to figure out your own method.
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Old 11-26-2013, 06:18 PM   #15
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Sorry for the 40 question assault, lol I just get excited and want to know everything. lol

Thanks boozer.
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Old 11-26-2013, 09:43 PM   #16
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If your speaking of internal temps for ribs..dont recall ever knowin anybody who checked it. I consider them done when I can reach in and rip two adjacent bones loose in the middle of the rack. When a person can do that...then foil and let them swelter in the hot box for at least an hour..preferably two hours. Pit temp for ribs should be about 260..or thereabouts. Cooking them low and slow will dry them out too bad on most pits. Fancy commercial pits can cook much slower but not normally practical for us back yard types. I like Headcountry Purpose Rub for ribs. Normally a mail order item for me..Head Country | Head Country or close. Have tried various ho made rib rubs without being overly wowed. Harley's Sweet Rub is very good on ribs too. Know a bunch of folks who use that..but can be sorta hard to find...or used to be anyway.
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Old 11-26-2013, 09:54 PM   #17
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Oh, and if your smoker has a water pan, then yes , you should definitely use it.
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Old 11-27-2013, 08:12 AM   #18
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Hey Boozer,

What is the water pan used for besides, holding water? Wouldn't it end up streaming the meat rather then smoking it? It just seems kind of strange to me.
My smoker is a vertical cylinder with a bowl for wood on the bottom, a bowl for liquid above that and the grill for the meat above that. Sorry to bombard you with questions lol but I'm just trying to understand this better.

Thanks,
John
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Old 11-27-2013, 09:21 PM   #19
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No it dont steam it..but does add some moisture to the equation..which is pretty near necessary for proper cooking...and most especially with small amounts of meat. Have heard it said the water acts as a heat sink. Which guess it means it gives some thermal mass..takes up heat slowly and relases it back slowly..sorta like a big brick pit maybe. Sure wished our old pal Jim Ace Prather the Astrophysical Injuneer was still around. He could explain all this stuff using arithmetic. In the meantime..no need to try and reinvent the wheel. Start cooking some stuff and see how it turns out. If it aint fittin..tweak a thing or two and try it again. Its trial and error..the hallmark of the scientific method.
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Old 11-27-2013, 10:03 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigwheel View Post
No it dont steam it..but does add some moisture to the equation..which is pretty near necessary for proper cooking...and most especially with small amounts of meat. Have heard it said the water acts as a heat sink. Which guess it means it gives some thermal mass..takes up heat slowly and relases it back slowly..sorta like a big brick pit maybe. Sure wished our old pal Jim Ace Prather the Astrophysical Injuneer was still around. He could explain all this stuff using arithmetic. In the meantime..no need to try and reinvent the wheel. Start cooking some stuff and see how it turns out. If it aint fittin..tweak a thing or two and try it again. Its trial and error..the hallmark of the scientific method.
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