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Old 07-31-2008, 02:22 PM   #1
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Well tell us whut you need to know. I know a fella that knows everything but he aint got a compooter. Stays too busy wood working I guess. I will axe him the question and repoat back.

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Old 07-31-2008, 03:26 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuck_050382
one of the pieces has a split in it, i want to keep it for character. Is there any way to fill this? I was thinking clear epoxy. I figured getting Polyurethane in there would be insufficient.

Also I am not sure how to finish it. I was thinking maybe 3 coat of an outdoor Polyurethane. Other suggestions?

Thanks
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I remember from woodworking in high school on wide boards ya supose to rip em into 8in wide or less then glue em back together using dowels & clamps. (Ripping em through the split area cracks)
They will need to be run true a surface plane to smooth out the joints.
Normaly you would start out with a thicker board than what your finished plank needs to be. Like 1&1/4in rough cut to make 1in finished board stock.
This HAS to be Filled & SEALED on both sides to prevent warping when done.
I remember it was a 3 step process, Filler, sealer then finish coat.
I made some beautiful home sterio speakers that are 20in deep (3 ripped pieces doweled together) using natrual finished african mahoganey.
The local school board ordered tons of rough cut large stock fine furniture grade wood
This was 38 years ago
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Old 07-31-2008, 03:41 PM   #3
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[quote=007bond-jb]
Quote:
Originally Posted by "Chuck_050382":2i2e3wc0
one of the pieces has a split in it, i want to keep it for character. Is there any way to fill this? I was thinking clear epoxy. I figured getting Polyurethane in there would be insufficient.

Also I am not sure how to finish it. I was thinking maybe 3 coat of an outdoor Polyurethane. Other suggestions?

Thanks
Chuck
I remember from woodworking in high school on wide boards ya supose to rip em into 8in wide or less then glue em back together using dowels & clamps. (Ripping em through the split area cracks)
They will need to be run true a surface plane to smooth out the joints.
Normaly you would start out with a thicker board than what your finished plank needs to be. Like 1&1/4in rough cut to make 1in finished board stock.
This HAS to be Filled & SEALED on both sides to prevent warping when done.
I remember it was a 3 step process, Filler, sealer then finish coat.
I made some beautiful home sterio speakers that are 20in deep (3 ripped pieces doweled together) using natrual finished african mahoganey.
The local school board ordered tons of rough cut large stock fine furniture grade wood
This was 38 years ago[/quote:2i2e3wc0]

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Old 07-31-2008, 05:16 PM   #4
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I have a wood shop and did just what you are intending. JB is right on with his advice.
Wood glue has NO strength when used in a gap. The edges have to be flush and tight. Ripping to 6" wide is good to prevent 'cupping' across the board.
I milled my oak to 3/4" thickness and then glued up 3/4" by 1 1/2" strips around the outside edge (underneath) which gave the appearance of 1 1/2 thickness. Fill knot holes and cracks with clear or colored epoxy.
I used spar varnish (MinWax) which is holding up well out in the weather. Spar varnish allows flexing which you will get from temp swings.
This pic gives a little peek of my table board.
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Old 08-01-2008, 02:20 AM   #5
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Now you folks expecting me to believe that board or its glued composites aint going to be be effected by the heat of that pit when the lid is lifted or as the briskets cook? As my old surrogate step daddy from Graham was fond of saying..."Yall are sillier than a tree full of ass holes." I save that Oak for book shelves and mount some thick steel in that area. SS if you got money. Diamond plate aluminum for the po boys who want to act right. I just got plain old mild steel painted with hot temp paint on my pit. Course I aint there for show. I come to cook.

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