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Old 04-06-2005, 12:48 PM   #1
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Grass

Okay it's almost 80* here today and I'm going home to do the first grass cutting of the year. Am I the first one (besides folks in much warmer climates) to do the inaugural 2005 grass cutting?

Also, I don't have a green thumb and need advice. I fertilize every spring and fall, my grass grows beautifully and thick. But I do not have the real dark green color I am trying to achieve. If I spread lime would that help the color?
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Old 04-06-2005, 12:55 PM   #2
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It depends on the type of grass you have on whether it will get that deep green or not. as far as lime is concerned, here's some info from Scotts FAQ ~ Your PH level is the key:


Liming is done to adjust the pH of soil. The pH of your soil should range between 5.5 and 7.5. If the pH is above or below this range, then grass plants have difficulty absorbing certain essential nutrients they need to thrive. When the pH falls below 5.5, then lime should be added to increase it. If your pH is over 7.5, then sulfur is added to reduce it. The ideal pH for grass plants is typically around 6.5.

The amount of lime that is needed will vary based on your pH level. To find out the amount you need to add, we recommend first conducting a pH test. Test kits can be purchased from local stores for a small charge. After you determine your pH level, we then suggest that you contact your agricultural extension agent. They are familiar with the soil types in your area and will be able to suggest the amount of lime you need to raise your pH to the optimal level. You can find the phone number for your county agricultural extension agent by looking in your phone book's government listings for your county.

Applying lime does not interfere with any Scotts products. Therefore, you can apply lime the same day you apply any Scotts lawn product.
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Old 04-06-2005, 12:58 PM   #3
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Man I'm no grass expert. I did have a summer job one time at an arborist, and learned a lot, but mainly about trees and bushes and things. I think the key thing this time of year is too get some fertilizer in the soil and keep it watered, but Bill probably has the best response.
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Old 04-06-2005, 01:07 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Niagara River Smoker
It depends on the type of grass you have on whether it will get that deep green or not. as far as lime is concerned, here's some info from Scotts FAQ ~ Your PH level is the key:


Liming is done to adjust the pH of soil. The pH of your soil should range between 5.5 and 7.5. If the pH is above or below this range, then grass plants have difficulty absorbing certain essential nutrients they need to thrive. When the pH falls below 5.5, then lime should be added to increase it. If your pH is over 7.5, then sulfur is added to reduce it. The ideal pH for grass plants is typically around 6.5.

The amount of lime that is needed will vary based on your pH level. To find out the amount you need to add, we recommend first conducting a pH test. Test kits can be purchased from local stores for a small charge. After you determine your pH level, we then suggest that you contact your agricultural extension agent. They are familiar with the soil types in your area and will be able to suggest the amount of lime you need to raise your pH to the optimal level. You can find the phone number for your county agricultural extension agent by looking in your phone book's government listings for your county.

Applying lime does not interfere with any Scotts products. Therefore, you can apply lime the same day you apply any Scotts lawn product.
Thanks for the info, gonna call the county and take them a sample!
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Old 04-06-2005, 01:11 PM   #5
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FYI, you can get soil PH test kits at Home Depot or other garden centers..
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Old 04-06-2005, 01:20 PM   #6
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Let it turn into all weeds, and then keep it mowed down! Woodman
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Old 04-06-2005, 02:34 PM   #7
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I'm just gonna be a dirt grower.....weeds are greeen, so is moss...Lime will make your lawn pretty green, but if you put too much on won't it kinda burn it?

Cutting already? I just started raking....my lawn is a lovely shade of light brown.....

Rob
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Old 04-06-2005, 04:45 PM   #8
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Just now finished mowing mine for the first time this year.. Got the beer in the huggie, and the steaks ready to go.
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Old 04-06-2005, 05:00 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by TexLaw
If your extension office will do the soil test, I'd let them do it. I don't trust those home pH kits. There's too much room for error, just in the protocol, and the reagents can get bad with age. Let the experts handle it and give you some good advice. You don't want to make your situation worse due to bad information.

After you treat your lawn, you might want to get it tested again, just so you have a baseline for future reference.


TL
Nuttin' wrong with that. Never had any problems with my tests though..'Course, I didn't leave it in the shed or garage all summer either..

Mowed my lawn all year in Orlando (Every 2 to 3 weeks in Jan and Feb)...Have another couple of weeks to go up here.
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Old 04-06-2005, 05:16 PM   #10
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Nitrogen makes your grass grow like hell, but be careful . . Too much of a good thing...
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