Culinary School ? - BBQ Central

Go Back   BBQ Central > Corporate Administration > General (Non-BBQ) Discussion
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-25-2008, 12:38 PM   #1
Pope O'Que


 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Colorado
Posts: 2,416
Culinary School ?

Anyone here go to Culinary school?

Just wanted some opinions - Im really wanting to go but its so damn much $$$$$$$
__________________

__________________
One of the best things about my hobby is that my family and friends are fed well.
Member #1462
BBQ ........So easy a caveman could do it.....?

Never look your best friend in the eye while your makin' sausage.
dollarbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 12:50 PM   #2
BBQ Centralite
 
Kloset BBQR's Avatar


 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Hudson, OH
Posts: 3,150
I went to BBQ Bootcamp at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY.

Had a great time and ate very well there.

Some of the best chefs in America come from there but if costs about 35k a year to attend but there chefs are sought after world wide. You won't have a problem getting a job if you go there but it will take some time to recover your investment.
__________________

__________________
Smoke 'em if you got 'em!

KCBS member & Certified BBQ Judge

The mission of the Kansas City Barbeque Society is to celebrate, teach, preserve, and promote barbecue as a culinary technique, sport and art form.

Sic semper tyrannis!

http://www.impeach-barack-obama.com/

http://theglennbeck912project.com/
Kloset BBQR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 12:53 PM   #3
Moderator
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Myrtle Beach
Posts: 14,162
Tim from JT's bbq went or is still going.
He doesn't post much here, but you can probably
find him at www.carolinabbqtalk.com
__________________
The trouble with quotes on the internet is that it difficult to determine whether or not they are genuine - Abraham Lincoln
Captain Morgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 03:44 PM   #4
Graduate of BBQ Central


 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: pa
Posts: 680
I have not gone to culinary but have you read Anthony Bourdain's kitchen confidential? This seems to outline the real life of chefs. I highly recommend this book if you are even faintly considering becoming a chef. Also how old are you? I here if you are not very young it is hard to successfully break into the industry.

Chris
__________________
"Excuse me, do you know if these gloves are good for killing a man?"-- Dale Gribble
chris1237 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 04:01 PM   #5
Pope O'Que


 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Colorado
Posts: 2,416
Im not really looking to be a chef as much as I am wanting to "just Know" alot more - but its a big investment. My neighbors son is a sous chef for a big hotel at Denver international airport and says there is NO money in it 'till you hit management.

We have a school here that does Mon thru Wed from 5 to 10pm for 4 months and its $8000. Sounds better than $30,000 for the full time gig!



THANKS FOR THE INPUT.......

ANYONE ELSE?
__________________
One of the best things about my hobby is that my family and friends are fed well.
Member #1462
BBQ ........So easy a caveman could do it.....?

Never look your best friend in the eye while your makin' sausage.
dollarbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 04:58 PM   #6
BBQ Centralite
 
Woodman's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Mentor, Oh
Posts: 4,457
If you just want to "learn more" you can do it cheaper than $8K!! Buy interesting cookbooks, read, and practice. I would start with "The Joy of Cooking" . Alot of very useful info in there! I wanted to learn about Oaxacan Cuisine so I bought a book and started trying to find the exotic ingredients. Now I can cook Mole Negro, Pollo in Pipian Sauce, Huitlacoche Tamales in Bananna leaves, and more! Good Luck. WM
__________________
"I was born to cook for people"
Woodman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 07:30 PM   #7
Saint O'Que
 
Helen_Paradise's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: SoCal
Posts: 1,245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodman
If you just want to "learn more" you can do it cheaper than $8K!! Buy interesting cookbooks, read, and practice. I would start with "The Joy of Cooking" . Alot of very useful info in there! I wanted to learn about Oaxacan Cuisine so I bought a book and started trying to find the exotic ingredients. Now I can cook Mole Negro, Pollo in Pipian Sauce, Huitlacoche Tamales in Bananna leaves, and more! Good Luck. WM
Oaxaca, seriously...one of my favorite words to say!!!!!
__________________
30 Helens agree...to disagree.
Helen_Paradise is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2008, 07:43 PM   #8
Pope O'Que


 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Colorado
Posts: 2,416
Well actually Id like to do some catering too......I love to cook (for people) and love to bbq and grill. Usually when anyone comes over they ask "What the hell you cookin' now?" hahaa


Thanks for the input!
__________________
One of the best things about my hobby is that my family and friends are fed well.
Member #1462
BBQ ........So easy a caveman could do it.....?

Never look your best friend in the eye while your makin' sausage.
dollarbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2008, 07:28 AM   #9
BBQ Central Pro


 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Lindenhurst, NY
Posts: 994
Going to school to be a chef...it's like most other professions where you need a degree, or teachable knowledge .. some people make it big, some people make it, some people barely survive, and some people go another career path..

a lot depends on time/place/coincidence/luck/right place right time/do I initially work in a small restaurant/ do I work for a hotel chain/ do I work in large restaurant/conumdrum.. Do I even stay cooking, or work in one of the anchillary businesses that surround a restaurant, or food establishment..

there's absolutely nothing that says you'll be a highly acclaimed chef, making tons of dough, but there are positives to going to culinary school.. you'll always have the proper basic skills to continue in the field, if that is your wish..

Many people are quickly turned off in the culinary industry.. after paying anywhere between $5k-$35k a year for this highly tauted career path, the only initial job they can find is a pantry chef, making $10-$12 an hour.. those entry level wages have deflated more than one aspiring chef's ego...

The culinary business is very fluid, and transient... people usually move on to another opportunity in 2- 5 or so years for various reasons..

Money, being the ever present lure to leave a place of employment... like any other job, how long are you willing to be paid slave like wages before you move on.. are you willing to hold out for that Sous Chef, or Executive Sous Chef position for a few years, or do you move on at the drop of a hat for a job that pays you $15-$18 an hour.. do you go to a place that pays you a salary of $40K throughout the year, throughout the slow business periods, or do you stay at the place that will pay $$15-$18 an hour, and cut your hours during the slow periods during the year..

Time is also a factor.. Most places you will work at require that if you are on salary, you will work a minimum of 50 hours a week... which usually turns into 55-60 hours...and, if you are on salary you will be told to work additional hours, over and above the hourly wage people, for the same pay

Pressure in the work place is something that some people thrive on, others like a more realaxed approach... working under deadlines for service, banquets, weddings, parties, etc . is something cetain people thrive, others like, or can only do well in, a less stressful atmosphere...

Owners, bosses, and people in authority is another important factor.. big, large, established places are like like a military machine for the most part..and most of the time they have to be, to choreograph all the different phases of putting on an affair, or lunch/dinner service.. depending on the circumstances this is a good thing, but there are times, and like any other job, there are ways to handle people, and there are ways not to handle people.. you really have no control over any surpervisor, just the choice to stay at the place, or leave for a more suitable place to work..

Place is another one.. if you're single, and all of a sudden you hear of a great opportunity at a resort in an area known for great weather, and other pleasurable amenities in life, do you leave a place you are at, and are getting ahead career wise, for a change or pace, better lifestyle, or hopefully a better opportunity.. would you be able to leave at the drop of a hat if you are married ?

It is rare that you will work in a "local" place, and make a lot of money.. Working for a small business owner, which is what a restaurant is, rarely pays you handsomely... you might get a decent wage, but the ceiling on those wages is not that high...

Some people luck out and get asked by a restuarant owner to be a chef, obviously after a period of time in the industry, and your reputation is well established, to be an equity partner, or you share in the profits of the restaurant... those opportunities are few and far between..

if you have money socked away, you can also partner up with someone to open a place... takes alot of dinero to open a restaurant... just think of a small BBQ restaurant, and the equipment needed, just to open the door... between a decent sized smoker, hood system, walk-ins, freezers, bathrooms, sinks, steam tables, fry machine, counters, cash registers, computers, lawyers, accountants, permits, fees, contractors, intial food cost to stock the place, etc., you're looking at over $50K, at an absolute minimum. and, a lot more in more expensive areas of the United States... In NYC, if you don't have a sizable budget with a lot of 000's in it, you might as well not even think about opening a place..more than one person has gone into the business with a budget, and what they think is a lot of spendable money at hand, and has wished/needed/ or had to beg and borrow more money, just to open the door, or fold

More than one established chef has left a place of employment to work in a place that suits them more than the last job... I know of more than one chef that has packed it all in and have gone to smaller jobs, less responsibility, less stress, less hours, more pleasant supervisors/owners.. Theres' more than 1 chef working on a cruise line because of the lifestyle

In the end, it's all about your love of food, and how much crappolla you are willing to stand for, to stay at a place..do you stay for the money, prestige, career advancement opportunities, atmosphere, loaylty to owner, paycheck, etc.... not much different than other carers in a lot of ways

Not quite sure how to articulate this without sounding cynical, because I'm not... The advent of celebrity chefs, super star culinary figures, and the Food Network, have fooled than one inspiring chef into thinking they can share in those riches, or even come close.. I equate being a big time chef to a College athlete, playing at Division 1 schools... no idea how many people play on that top level, but only a few will make to the professional ranks... in the end, it doesnt matter how much desire they have, how much fortitude they have, or how much dedication they have....it's slight edges that make the differnce.. if you go to the scouting combines, and you run the 40 yard dash in a certain time, and someone beats you by .002 seconds, you loose.. if you can bench press 375 pounds, and someone else bench presses 390 lbs, you loose.... it slight margins that makes the difference... same as a culinary carreer..

there's no be-all-end all answers .. It's what will make you happy that will make the difference, and it's inside of you that will make the difference

Call me anytime if you need to talk
__________________
Aim for Sucess, not perfection
Good Country, This America
Bobberqer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2008, 07:48 AM   #10
BBQ Centralite
 
Woodman's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Mentor, Oh
Posts: 4,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Helen_Paradise
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodman
If you just want to "learn more" you can do it cheaper than $8K!! Buy interesting cookbooks, read, and practice. I would start with "The Joy of Cooking" . Alot of very useful info in there! I wanted to learn about Oaxacan Cuisine so I bought a book and started trying to find the exotic ingredients. Now I can cook Mole Negro, Pollo in Pipian Sauce, Huitlacoche Tamales in Bananna leaves, and more! Good Luck. WM
Oaxaca, seriously...one of my favorite words to say!!!!!
Me too! I also like "Mihoaca!" One day, I will go to Oaxaca, the "Land of Seven Moles!"
__________________
"I was born to cook for people"
Woodman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2008, 08:02 AM   #11
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
007bond-jb's Avatar


 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Baton Rouge La
Posts: 6,428
Most all grad's from The Culinary School Of Louisiana make $90k just out of school. This is due to the highly sought after cajun style of cooking
__________________
BBQ Shaken Not Stirred
He who don't cook, better not complain
Why limit happy to an hour
Yes beer qualifies as an appetizer


BOY!

http://www.youtube.com/user/007bondjb
007bond-jb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2008, 08:53 AM   #12
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
Bill The Grill Guy's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Virginia
Posts: 5,449
Here is a suggestion for you. See if there is a technical ed school near you. They usually offer a culinary program.
__________________
Bill The Grill Guy
www.billthegrillguy.com
"Life, it's what you do between meals."

http://img76.imageshack.us/img76/3674/platezi0.png
Bill The Grill Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2008, 12:23 PM   #13
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
surfinsapo's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 5,044
I'm a teacher at a Culinary school... JB is one of my students.. He's passing most classes...Really, I have never taken classes, but used to eat lunch at the college and test all the food they made.. It was cheap too....
surfinsapo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2008, 04:01 PM   #14
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
007bond-jb's Avatar


 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Baton Rouge La
Posts: 6,428
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfinsapo
I'm a teacher at a Culinary school... JB is one of my students.. He's passing most classes...Really, I have never taken classes, but used to eat lunch at the college and test all the food they made.. It was cheap too....

HA HA HA... BOY! ......... Damm Non Union GT's

Bring You GT ass down here to BR & I'll show you "Whats Cookin Doc"
DGT
__________________
BBQ Shaken Not Stirred
He who don't cook, better not complain
Why limit happy to an hour
Yes beer qualifies as an appetizer


BOY!

http://www.youtube.com/user/007bondjb
007bond-jb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2008, 05:14 PM   #15
BBQ Centralite


 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Daytona Beach, FL
Posts: 3,323
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill The Grill Guy
Here is a suggestion for you. See if there is a technical ed school near you. They usually offer a culinary program.
That or check with your community college. Our local one has a very good culinary program.
__________________
John

"De gustibus non disputandum est,"
John A. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2008, 06:07 PM   #16
Official BBQ Central Mark
 
surfinsapo's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 5,044
Quote:
Originally Posted by 007bond-jb
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfinsapo
I'm a teacher at a Culinary school... JB is one of my students.. He's passing most classes...Really, I have never taken classes, but used to eat lunch at the college and test all the food they made.. It was cheap too....

HA HA HA... BOY! ......... Damm Non Union GT's

Bring You GT ass down here to BR & I'll show you "Whats Cookin Doc"
DGT
don't you mean bring my ass up there to BR CK? last time I was coming you left town!!! Scardy cat!!! I can read directions on the back of boxes as good as you can CK!!!
surfinsapo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2008, 07:30 PM   #17
BBQ Centralite
 
Woodman's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Mentor, Oh
Posts: 4,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by 007bond-jb
Most all grad's from The Culinary School Of Louisiana make $90k just out of school. This is due to the highly sought after cajun style of cooking
I wouldn't live down there for less than $100K
__________________
"I was born to cook for people"
Woodman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-28-2008, 07:54 PM   #18
Rag
BBQ Centralite
 
Rag's Avatar


 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Berks Cty, Pa.
Posts: 3,020
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobberqer
Going to school to be a chef...it's like most other professions where you need a degree, or teachable knowledge .. some people make it big, some people make it, some people barely survive, and some people go another career path..

a lot depends on time/place/coincidence/luck/right place right time/do I initially work in a small restaurant/ do I work for a hotel chain/ do I work in large restaurant/conumdrum.. Do I even stay cooking, or work in one of the anchillary businesses that surround a restaurant, or food establishment..

there's absolutely nothing that says you'll be a highly acclaimed chef, making tons of dough, but there are positives to going to culinary school.. you'll always have the proper basic skills to continue in the field, if that is your wish..

Many people are quickly turned off in the culinary industry.. after paying anywhere between $5k-$35k a year for this highly tauted career path, the only initial job they can find is a pantry chef, making $10-$12 an hour.. those entry level wages have deflated more than one aspiring chef's ego...

The culinary business is very fluid, and transient... people usually move on to another opportunity in 2- 5 or so years for various reasons..

Money, being the ever present lure to leave a place of employment... like any other job, how long are you willing to be paid slave like wages before you move on.. are you willing to hold out for that Sous Chef, or Executive Sous Chef position for a few years, or do you move on at the drop of a hat for a job that pays you $15-$18 an hour.. do you go to a place that pays you a salary of $40K throughout the year, throughout the slow business periods, or do you stay at the place that will pay $$15-$18 an hour, and cut your hours during the slow periods during the year..

Time is also a factor.. Most places you will work at require that if you are on salary, you will work a minimum of 50 hours a week... which usually turns into 55-60 hours...and, if you are on salary you will be told to work additional hours, over and above the hourly wage people, for the same pay

Pressure in the work place is something that some people thrive on, others like a more realaxed approach... working under deadlines for service, banquets, weddings, parties, etc . is something cetain people thrive, others like, or can only do well in, a less stressful atmosphere...

Owners, bosses, and people in authority is another important factor.. big, large, established places are like like a military machine for the most part..and most of the time they have to be, to choreograph all the different phases of putting on an affair, or lunch/dinner service.. depending on the circumstances this is a good thing, but there are times, and like any other job, there are ways to handle people, and there are ways not to handle people.. you really have no control over any surpervisor, just the choice to stay at the place, or leave for a more suitable place to work..

Place is another one.. if you're single, and all of a sudden you hear of a great opportunity at a resort in an area known for great weather, and other pleasurable amenities in life, do you leave a place you are at, and are getting ahead career wise, for a change or pace, better lifestyle, or hopefully a better opportunity.. would you be able to leave at the drop of a hat if you are married ?

It is rare that you will work in a "local" place, and make a lot of money.. Working for a small business owner, which is what a restaurant is, rarely pays you handsomely... you might get a decent wage, but the ceiling on those wages is not that high...

Some people luck out and get asked by a restuarant owner to be a chef, obviously after a period of time in the industry, and your reputation is well established, to be an equity partner, or you share in the profits of the restaurant... those opportunities are few and far between..

if you have money socked away, you can also partner up with someone to open a place... takes alot of dinero to open a restaurant... just think of a small BBQ restaurant, and the equipment needed, just to open the door... between a decent sized smoker, hood system, walk-ins, freezers, bathrooms, sinks, steam tables, fry machine, counters, cash registers, computers, lawyers, accountants, permits, fees, contractors, intial food cost to stock the place, etc., you're looking at over $50K, at an absolute minimum. and, a lot more in more expensive areas of the United States... In NYC, if you don't have a sizable budget with a lot of 000's in it, you might as well not even think about opening a place..more than one person has gone into the business with a budget, and what they think is a lot of spendable money at hand, and has wished/needed/ or had to beg and borrow more money, just to open the door, or fold

More than one established chef has left a place of employment to work in a place that suits them more than the last job... I know of more than one chef that has packed it all in and have gone to smaller jobs, less responsibility, less stress, less hours, more pleasant supervisors/owners.. Theres' more than 1 chef working on a cruise line because of the lifestyle

In the end, it's all about your love of food, and how much crappolla you are willing to stand for, to stay at a place..do you stay for the money, prestige, career advancement opportunities, atmosphere, loaylty to owner, paycheck, etc.... not much different than other carers in a lot of ways

Not quite sure how to articulate this without sounding cynical, because I'm not... The advent of celebrity chefs, super star culinary figures, and the Food Network, have fooled than one inspiring chef into thinking they can share in those riches, or even come close.. I equate being a big time chef to a College athlete, playing at Division 1 schools... no idea how many people play on that top level, but only a few will make to the professional ranks... in the end, it doesnt matter how much desire they have, how much fortitude they have, or how much dedication they have....it's slight edges that make the differnce.. if you go to the scouting combines, and you run the 40 yard dash in a certain time, and someone beats you by .002 seconds, you loose.. if you can bench press 375 pounds, and someone else bench presses 390 lbs, you loose.... it slight margins that makes the difference... same as a culinary carreer..

there's no be-all-end all answers .. It's what will make you happy that will make the difference, and it's inside of you that will make the difference

Call me anytime if you need to talk
Great, great explaination of an industry that's hard to understand from the outside. Thanks Bob
__________________
Sleeps till done
Gasser
Weber Kettle (it's crap...gave away)
WSM 22.5
Meadow Creek TS250 (sold)
Meadow Creek chicken cooker
Rag is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2008, 11:38 PM   #19
Baby Back
 
bbqfans's Avatar


 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: NWOhio
Posts: 85
Cooking school...

Dollarbill, I started out as you,with a wish. I to could not afford the appox.$40,000 to go the 2-3 years for that piece of paper. Alternate plan was concieved after talking to a chef friend of mine.
He suggested starting as a dishwasher and moving up the ladder as seen fit by the boss(I worked inn several places as to get a rounded feeling for the job). After several months I joined a Chef's Assn. and tok advantage of thier training program. This consisted of doing all the prescribed classes offered by the big schools, but at the cost of only the books provided by the Assn.
Yes, it took a little longer due to evening(sometimes) classes, but in the long run I achieved Chef status in 2-1/2 yrs.(Chef deCuisine).
There is a lot of OJT and IMOP is the Best way to learn. Structured training is just that(IMOP),monkey see monkey do!!
In the way I learned I was given many opportunities to use MY imagination and a chance to impress the Chef!!!

This is just my thoughts , experience is the best teacher!!
BTW, I saved over $35,000 buck that way and I is a Chef!!!
__________________

__________________
My Arsenal includes:
1-Meco WaterSmoker
1-Brinkman SnP(side burner)
1-NewBraunsfeld RedRiver(side burner)
1-Tejas2040CC
2-burn barrels(I am a purist-wood only)
1-yellow doggie
1-three legged cat
1-wifey
**beware the O.S.D.**
-Obsessive Smoking Disorder-
Happy smokes-;}-
bbqfans is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off







Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×