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Old 09-13-2007, 01:36 PM   #1
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Arroz con Pollo

First, sorry but no pix. When I do leftovers, maybe I'll take some snaps and add them to the thread. Maybe.

I've never been really happy with my arroz con pollo. I've had problems getting the right texture on the rice; getting the chicken cooked but not overcooked; and getting a good flavor balance with echoes of Spain, the Caribbean and Mexico. Last night, I nailed it!

10 chicken thighs, bone in, skin on
3 cups medium grain California rice (Hinode or Cal-Rose)*
Extra virgin olive oil
Corn oil
(Optional: Spanish, not Mexican, style chorizo; or, Linquica; or, pepperoni, cut in small pieces)
1 medium brown onion, chopped
1/2 medium green bell pepper, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
3 cans chicken stock
1/2 can El Pato Salsa de Tomatillo Fresca, or 3 - 4 tbs of Pico Pica sauce.
1/4 cup dry vermouth, or dry white wine
1/2 - 1 cup frozen green peas
Sliced pimentos (to taste)
Salad cut green olives (to taste)
Saffron
(Optional: Annatto***)
Bay leaf
Salt
Pepper
Sweet paprika
Smoked Paprika

Wash and dry the chicken. Season the skin side with salt, pepper, and a good quality sweet paprika.

Open a can of broth, and pour about half of it into a small glass bowl. Separate the saffron strands and add them to the stock. Put it in the microwave and warm it -- 60 seconds on high. Set aside and allow the saffron to bloom.

In a 1 cup measuring cup mix 1/2 can of the salsa fresca with two ounces of Vermouth, pinch of ground annatto or 1/2 tsp of annatto oil (if using), and 1/2 tsp of smoked paprika. Mix and set aside.

Heat a heavy 12" saute pan a k a "chicken fryer" (straight sided skillet). Mix the extra virgin olive oil with corn oil, 50/50 so that there's about 3/8" of oil in the pan. Allow the oil time to come to temp (medium-high), then (add the optional sausage; when the sausage when has flavored the oil and is well browned remove and set aside, about five minutes; then) add 5 of the thighs, skin side down. Cook them until they are well browned, around 7 minutes. Turn, and cook the bone side until browned, around 5 minutes. Set aside on a plate and do the remaining thighs in the same way. It's important to brown in two batches because if you overcrowd the pan, the thighs will not brown properly. Timing this step correctly is critical to getting the chicken fully but not over cooked. Don't short it. The chicken will get some, but not lots of cooking later.

During the browning the fat from the chicken skin will render into the oil, increasing the amount. Pour off about half so that you’re left with about 1/4" of oil/fat left in the pan. Add the onions and peppers. Sauté over high heat until the peppers begin to soften. Add the garlic, and toss (or stir).

Add the rice and stir to coat with oil. Raise heat to high. Stir, toss or turn the rice, until it starts to become opaque. Do not allow rice to burn or stick to the pan. About five minutes.

Still over high heat -- Add the hot sauce/wine mixture and enough of the saffron/stock mixture to cover the rice completely. You may need to add some of the unmixed canned stock, too. Bring to a full boil and gently shake the pan to evenly distribute the rice. Tuck a bay leaf or two into the rice.

Add half of the remaining stock, and return to the boil.

Add the rest of the stock, and return to the boil. Reduce heat to a bare simmer. Put the thighs on top of the rice. Cover. Reduce heat just a skosh more (It will simmer over a lower flame when covered than not covered.)

Simmer for 16 minutes exactly. (In other words, use a damn timer. Don't trust yourself to look at your watch!) Turn flame off, but leave covered for five minutes. Open cover, add the peas, and close cover for seven minutes.

Open cover, remove chicken and set aside. Remove the bay leaves and discard. Toss the rice with a fork to fluff. Final texture should be slightly sticky. Add the about 2 tbs of sliced pimentos, about the same amount of salad olives (sliced green olives with pimentos), and some chopped parsley. Toss to mix these additions into the rice.

Arroz con pollo may be plated or served directly from the pan. If plating, mound rice onto the plate sprinkle a little more parsley on it, and arrange the chicken so it's mostly on the rice, but a little on the plate. If serving from the pan, sprinkle a little parsley on the rice, and arrange the chicken so that some is pushed into the rice, and some lays flat on top.

Perhaps the best of all starters would be an avocado and onion salad, simply dressed with oil and vinegar. Undoubtedly, the best sides are fried plantains and (of all things) toasted French bread. A fresh, dry white wine such like a pinot grigio would go well. So would a good beer along the lines of an IPA, or even a very light lager such as MGD or Pacifico. A Hefeweizen with a squeeze would be damn near perfect, as would a mojito if the rum quotient was on the low side.

This is a first draft of a recipe that finally got perfected. What do you think? Too complicated?

Rich

*A very tricky rice for these purposes. A long grain basmati type would be safer. Just make sure you check the rice package for the recommended ratio of liquid to rice before you start measuring and adding and whatnot. Also be aware that as quantities increase the proportional amount of liquid decreases. You do not want to go above the recommended ratio. Slightly below is perfect.

**Commonly available in urban California supermarkets. I don't know what availability is like anywhere else. If you can't find El Pato (Mexican, or imported foods, or tomato sauce section) or Pico Pica (hot sauce section), you could use a tbs of tomato paste and some hot sauce. If you use paste, add it directly to the rice before adding any liquid and stir the rice so the "raw" has a chance to cook off the paste.

***A k a achiote. If you have to ask ...

R.
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Old 09-13-2007, 02:36 PM   #2
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Re: Arroz con Pollo

Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze
First, sorry but no pix.
Moot post....Never happened. You know the rules. :P
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Old 09-13-2007, 03:56 PM   #3
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Re: Arroz con Pollo

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottyDaQ
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze
First, sorry but no pix.
Moot post....Never happened. You know the rules. :P

I've been slowly but surely exploring Champagne in the past year or so, tasting as many as I can from both the big houses and individual growers. "Big house" refers to producers who purchase grapes from various growers and craft a Champagne that expresses a certain style that will be consistent from year to year. Examples of big house Champagne include Perrier-Jouet, Bollinger, Krug, and Duval-Leroy. "Grower Champagne" refers to wines that are crafted from grapes grown by the producer. Examples of grower Champagne include Lallement, Pierre Peters, Gaston Chiquiet, and Henri Billiot.

The distinction between "big house" and "grower" Champagne is an economic one. If a grower can profit from making wine (assuming they want to make wine), they usually make wine. If the costs of facilities, equipment, labor, risk, etc. are high enough, a grower might instead elect to sell grapes. Some producers both sell grapes and make wine.

In Champagne, there is room for market manipulation, apparently, and this is much under discussion lately. What happens, for example, if the financially deep "big houses" band together to squelch the supply of "grower" Champagne? How would they do that? By promising NOT to purchase grapes from growers who also make their own Champagne. Alice Feiring wrote about this recently and Eric Asimov mentioned it also in his recent blog post.

Stylistically the difference between big house and grower Champagne might not be detectable in a blind tasting - I wonder whether or not tasters would be able to identify wines as big house or grower in a blind tasting. Note to self - make this tasting happen this holiday season. I prefer to buy grower Champagne because I like the idea of buying wine made by a family who also grows the grapes, and also the idea of supporting smaller (or medium sized) businesses. I happily drink big house Champs too, but only when some kind soul is pouring it for me. When it's my dollar, I go for the growers.

Grower Champagne in my favorite wine shops tends to cost in the mid $30 to mid $40 range, a bit more for rose. Not cheap by any means, regardless of the value. So how to choose bottles to taste when a flop means over $30 out the window? I look for " A Terry Theise Selection" on the label. Theise has been a thorough and amorous student of Champagne (and other wine too - German Rieslings...) and his catalog (also recommended by Mssr. Asimov) is a great place to start.

Take a look at these quotes from the Theise catalog regarding two of Henri Billiot's Champagnes:


Henri Billiot Brut Réserve, N.V.
Many times I’ve felt, and said, this is the best N.V. Brut in all Champagne. That I’ve tasted! But I’m going to hedge just a little on the current cuvee, until I see what it does on the cork. I tasted a wine disgorged 2/07, made up of 50% 2003 and 25% each of ‘02-‘01. It was racy, loaded, complex and potentially amazing, but it was also disjointed and querulous from disgorgement-shock. The cuvee is always about 80% Pinot Noir but no one ever guesses, the wine is so animate, kinetic and hyper.
Henri Billiot Brut Rosé, N.V.
I forget how good this is because it’s always gone before I have a crack at it. They were pouring at at Alinea and I had a glass, and for a moment I almost forgot where I was (almost! It’s hard to forget when you’re sitting in the greatest restaurant in America…) the wine was so absurdly delicious. Again I tasted an 02/07 disgorgement but the Rosé withstood it superbly. The wine is always a year younger than the NV Brut, based only on demand; this one’s 50% ‘04 and 25% each ‘03-‘02, and the still red is 10-year old Ambonnay Pinot Noir. This may well be the best bottling yet; pure, direct roses and strawberries; chalky, vinous and charming; virtually perfect.
I don't know about you, but that really piqued my interest. So we recently tasted two Champagnes from Henri Billiot. We opened the Brut Réserve with a dessert of stewed rhubarb with fresh Vermont ricotta and a touch of wildflower honey - a terrific pairing. The astringent rhubarb with the rich and creamy ricotta went perfectly with the crystalline bubbly.

Henri Billiot Brut Réserve, N.V., $36 (Chambers Street Wines).
Nose of brioche and toast - lots of toast. Later on some berry and floral aromas. Honeysuckle, citrus, and a bit of yeast on the palate. All of this hangs on a strong frame of icy-stalactite acidity (yeah, that's a weird description, but work with me on this).

It is this contrast that makes the wine so fascinating to me. A definite re-buy.

We opened the rose to celebrate making it back to Brooklyn from out west in one piece, with a healthy and some what well rested baby. We enjoyed this wine with our brunch of Tello's Farm eggs, Flying Pig's Farm smoked ham, and Pain D'Avignon rye bread. Sorry - I am not one of those people who forces you to care about where my food comes from, but I do really like all of these products, so indulge me this once. Another great pairing, as the very dry rose bubbly worked perfectly with the smoky ham.

Henri Billiot Brut Rosé, N.V. $45 (Chambers Street Wines).
Lovely pale rusty pink color. Reserved nose at first but then glows with strawberry, flowers, toast, and caramel. Fresh palate with strawberry and some chalk, but the thing is the texture and the structure - light and elegant but somehow full and strong at the same time. Solid and ethereal. A great acid backbone. Another definite re-buy, but at $45 this falls into the special occasion category (sadly, as I could happily drink it every day).

Posted by Brooklynguy

Labels: Champagne, Sparkling wine


3 comments:
The Cheap Lush said...
Nothing will ever replace Champagne, but for those somewhat less special occasions, a top notch Vouvray Brut makes me nearly as happy. The best even have those crisp chalky, yeasty notes, but are more floral. Foreau makes a perennially delicious one, while the one from Bernard Fouquet at Domaine des Aubuisières is nearly as good and costs sixteen bucks at Astor, a very Wednesday night kind of price.

Kudos on your blog—I discovered it several weeks ago, and have since hoovered up almost all the past posts. All from a fellow Brooklynite!

Best,
Alex
Cobble Hill
thecheaplush.blogspot.com

8/28/2007 5:17 AM
Jill said...
How about Becky Wasserman Selections??? Those seem to be on par with the Thiese...

Interesting post.

8/29/2007 1:23 PM
Brooklynguy said...
Hi Alex - Thanks for your comments, and I'm so happy that you are enjoying the blog. I read a couple of posts at your site and I like it a lot. I will spend some more time there soon.

I like Foreau's bubbly too, and also Baumard's Cremant. My favorite Loire bubbly so far is the 2000 Huet, but that's gone now. For $10, Hureau makes a great one too. Never tried Fouquet's but I love his still wine so I'll give it a shot. I saw it at Astor and inexplicably did not buy any.

Thanks again, see you around -

Hey Jill - me likes Becky Wasserman too, particularly in Burgundy. By the way, I emailed you at the address you suggested and never heard back. you can email me at brooklynguy at earthlink dot net see you-

I always enjoy visiting the in-laws in the San Diego area. In addition to the lovely weather, the beautiful flowers and cacti that seem to line every road, and the quality family time, there are plenty of wine and food pleasures.

My pop-in-law, through his work, is the recipient of many a lavish wine gift. He enjoys wine and keeps a large wooden fridge in the garage (car-port, for those of you who do not speak French). He is mostly a Cali-cab type of guy, but he's open minded and enjoys asking guests to select a bottle for dinner. Here are a few interesting wines from the recent trip:



1998 Hafner Cabernet Sauvignon, (available only at the winery, price unknown but probably about $30). Hafner Cabernet and Chardonnay are house wines at pop-in-law's. This mature Cabernet was dark and opaque with a nice perfume of cassis and a hint of mint. Fruity and rich, but not at all overwhelming. Quite good with our steaks. This is the third or fourth vintage I've tasted with pop-in-law and I'm a fan.

NV Perrier Jouet Champagne, about $30. A flute was handed to me one evening and I took the opportunity to taste the wine "blind." I guessed it might be an American bubbly because it was a little sweet, and it was without the chalky yeasty thing that says "I am Champagne, hear me roar." Imagine my surprise when the bottle appeared to top off our flutes and it was Perrier Jouet, thus far my favorite big house Champagne. Ah, the humbling glory of tasting blind...It was good, but didn't hold a candle, in my opinion, to the grower stuff I've been digging lately.

2002 Domaine William Fevre 2002 Chablis Grand Cru Bougros, price unknown but probably about $45. I am just starting out on Chablis and I already have a little thing for Fevre, so when pop-in-law handed me his wine list, I eagerly selected it to accompany a dinner of shrimp salad and market vegetables. Sadly, it was distinctly underwhelming. Lots of oak, a very restrained nose and palate. Some clean lime after 45 minutes, but the personality on this wine is a no-show. Where are the minerals? The nervy acidity? Where, I beg of you, WHERE?

2000 Baumard Cremant de Loire Cuvee Millisime, $7 per glass at Cafe Chloe (below). Baumard, one of my favorite Loire Valley producers, is famous for dry Savennieres and sweet wines from Coteaux de Layon and Quarts de Chaume AOCs. This was my first taste of one of Baumard's sparkling wine. It had a light floral nose and an elegant and fresh tasting palate of citrus and green apple. A bit mineral, and very tasty. I haven't seen this wine at my local haunts, and I have no idea what the price would be per bottle, but I'm guessing around $15, and it would be a good value at that price.

2002 Baumard Savennieres Clos du Papillon, about $25, no longer available. This is Baumard's most highly rated Savennieres. Probably opened too early. The wine had an interesting but jumbled and tight nose of flowers, barrel toast, citrus, and what seemed like white chocolate. Medium body, nice hints of vanilla, ginger, and minerals, with good acidity, but palate too is tight and young, a little backward. I have a bottle of this wine somewhere and I am excited to taste it...in about 10 years.

Now to sum everything up, I agree with Scotty. It's a moot post with no pic's! I hope ya'll are still with me!
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Old 09-13-2007, 04:00 PM   #4
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Arroz con pollo Rocks man.. I could live just on that.!
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Old 09-13-2007, 04:20 PM   #5
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Where is Smoky Joe?? Looks like a cool recipe did you get that a take out joint, Boy!?
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Old 09-13-2007, 05:52 PM   #6
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wd,

I'm not sure I get your point about taking the recipe to anywhere other than peasant. There's nothing "gourmet" about it. A few Mexican ingredients you might not find in Iowa, and a little vermouth. Cal-Rose is hardly unusual rice, either. I agree about the red peppers, but my wife prefers bottled pimentos. What can I say? It works. Besides, in the pinche gabacho markets 'round here, red peppers are expensive.

I take your point that the recipe can use some editing, but I'm trying to write for people who don't have less command of technique than you. If you know a better instructional recipe please post it. I'm interested. The instructional aspects are important, as so many people overcook chicken and screw up rice altogether.

You completely lost me on the "open fire" and "cast iron pot" thing. Sounds like you could use a Boodles martini or something.


Larry,

Pol Roger is vastly underrated, and sometimes under priced. Maybe it's just an accident of geography but I have a real soft spot for the California sparklers -- especially Schramsberg Blanc de Noir. :P :P



JB,

A take out joint. Yes. How did you guess?

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Old 09-13-2007, 06:00 PM   #7
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Many thanks Rich !!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 09-13-2007, 06:28 PM   #8
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Re: Arroz con Pollo

[quote=Larry Wolfe]
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottyDaQ
Quote:
Originally Posted by "boar_d_laze":2g8c4eus
First, sorry but no pix.
Moot post....Never happened. You know the rules. :P

I've been slowly but surely exploring Champagne in the past year or so, tasting as many as I can from both the big houses and individual growers. "Big house" refers to producers who purchase grapes from various growers and craft a Champagne that expresses a certain style that will be consistent from year to year. Examples of big house Champagne include Perrier-Jouet, Bollinger, Krug, and Duval-Leroy. "Grower Champagne" refers to wines that are crafted from grapes grown by the producer. Examples of grower Champagne include Lallement, Pierre Peters, Gaston Chiquiet, and Henri Billiot.

The distinction between "big house" and "grower" Champagne is an economic one. If a grower can profit from making wine (assuming they want to make wine), they usually make wine. If the costs of facilities, equipment, labor, risk, etc. are high enough, a grower might instead elect to sell grapes. Some producers both sell grapes and make wine.

In Champagne, there is room for market manipulation, apparently, and this is much under discussion lately. What happens, for example, if the financially deep "big houses" band together to squelch the supply of "grower" Champagne? How would they do that? By promising NOT to purchase grapes from growers who also make their own Champagne. Alice Feiring wrote about this recently and Eric Asimov mentioned it also in his recent blog post.

Stylistically the difference between big house and grower Champagne might not be detectable in a blind tasting - I wonder whether or not tasters would be able to identify wines as big house or grower in a blind tasting. Note to self - make this tasting happen this holiday season. I prefer to buy grower Champagne because I like the idea of buying wine made by a family who also grows the grapes, and also the idea of supporting smaller (or medium sized) businesses. I happily drink big house Champs too, but only when some kind soul is pouring it for me. When it's my dollar, I go for the growers.

Grower Champagne in my favorite wine shops tends to cost in the mid $30 to mid $40 range, a bit more for rose. Not cheap by any means, regardless of the value. So how to choose bottles to taste when a flop means over $30 out the window? I look for " A Terry Theise Selection" on the label. Theise has been a thorough and amorous student of Champagne (and other wine too - German Rieslings...) and his catalog (also recommended by Mssr. Asimov) is a great place to start.

Take a look at these quotes from the Theise catalog regarding two of Henri Billiot's Champagnes:


Henri Billiot Brut Réserve, N.V.
Many times I’ve felt, and said, this is the best N.V. Brut in all Champagne. That I’ve tasted! But I’m going to hedge just a little on the current cuvee, until I see what it does on the cork. I tasted a wine disgorged 2/07, made up of 50% 2003 and 25% each of ‘02-‘01. It was racy, loaded, complex and potentially amazing, but it was also disjointed and querulous from disgorgement-shock. The cuvee is always about 80% Pinot Noir but no one ever guesses, the wine is so animate, kinetic and hyper.
Henri Billiot Brut Rosé, N.V.
I forget how good this is because it’s always gone before I have a crack at it. They were pouring at at Alinea and I had a glass, and for a moment I almost forgot where I was (almost! It’s hard to forget when you’re sitting in the greatest restaurant in America…) the wine was so absurdly delicious. Again I tasted an 02/07 disgorgement but the Rosé withstood it superbly. The wine is always a year younger than the NV Brut, based only on demand; this one’s 50% ‘04 and 25% each ‘03-‘02, and the still red is 10-year old Ambonnay Pinot Noir. This may well be the best bottling yet; pure, direct roses and strawberries; chalky, vinous and charming; virtually perfect.
I don't know about you, but that really piqued my interest. So we recently tasted two Champagnes from Henri Billiot. We opened the Brut Réserve with a dessert of stewed rhubarb with fresh Vermont ricotta and a touch of wildflower honey - a terrific pairing. The astringent rhubarb with the rich and creamy ricotta went perfectly with the crystalline bubbly.

Henri Billiot Brut Réserve, N.V., $36 (Chambers Street Wines).
Nose of brioche and toast - lots of toast. Later on some berry and floral aromas. Honeysuckle, citrus, and a bit of yeast on the palate. All of this hangs on a strong frame of icy-stalactite acidity (yeah, that's a weird description, but work with me on this).

It is this contrast that makes the wine so fascinating to me. A definite re-buy.

We opened the rose to celebrate making it back to Brooklyn from out west in one piece, with a healthy and some what well rested baby. We enjoyed this wine with our brunch of Tello's Farm eggs, Flying Pig's Farm smoked ham, and Pain D'Avignon rye bread. Sorry - I am not one of those people who forces you to care about where my food comes from, but I do really like all of these products, so indulge me this once. Another great pairing, as the very dry rose bubbly worked perfectly with the smoky ham.

Henri Billiot Brut Rosé, N.V. $45 (Chambers Street Wines).
Lovely pale rusty pink color. Reserved nose at first but then glows with strawberry, flowers, toast, and caramel. Fresh palate with strawberry and some chalk, but the thing is the texture and the structure - light and elegant but somehow full and strong at the same time. Solid and ethereal. A great acid backbone. Another definite re-buy, but at $45 this falls into the special occasion category (sadly, as I could happily drink it every day).

Posted by Brooklynguy

Labels: Champagne, Sparkling wine


3 comments:
The Cheap Lush said...
Nothing will ever replace Champagne, but for those somewhat less special occasions, a top notch Vouvray Brut makes me nearly as happy. The best even have those crisp chalky, yeasty notes, but are more floral. Foreau makes a perennially delicious one, while the one from Bernard Fouquet at Domaine des Aubuisières is nearly as good and costs sixteen bucks at Astor, a very Wednesday night kind of price.

Kudos on your blog—I discovered it several weeks ago, and have since hoovered up almost all the past posts. All from a fellow Brooklynite!

Best,
Alex
Cobble Hill
thecheaplush.blogspot.com

8/28/2007 5:17 AM
Jill said...
How about Becky Wasserman Selections??? Those seem to be on par with the Thiese...

Interesting post.

8/29/2007 1:23 PM
Brooklynguy said...
Hi Alex - Thanks for your comments, and I'm so happy that you are enjoying the blog. I read a couple of posts at your site and I like it a lot. I will spend some more time there soon.

I like Foreau's bubbly too, and also Baumard's Cremant. My favorite Loire bubbly so far is the 2000 Huet, but that's gone now. For $10, Hureau makes a great one too. Never tried Fouquet's but I love his still wine so I'll give it a shot. I saw it at Astor and inexplicably did not buy any.

Thanks again, see you around -

Hey Jill - me likes Becky Wasserman too, particularly in Burgundy. By the way, I emailed you at the address you suggested and never heard back. you can email me at brooklynguy at earthlink dot net see you-

I always enjoy visiting the in-laws in the San Diego area. In addition to the lovely weather, the beautiful flowers and cacti that seem to line every road, and the quality family time, there are plenty of wine and food pleasures.

My pop-in-law, through his work, is the recipient of many a lavish wine gift. He enjoys wine and keeps a large wooden fridge in the garage (car-port, for those of you who do not speak French). He is mostly a Cali-cab type of guy, but he's open minded and enjoys asking guests to select a bottle for dinner. Here are a few interesting wines from the recent trip:



1998 Hafner Cabernet Sauvignon, (available only at the winery, price unknown but probably about $30). Hafner Cabernet and Chardonnay are house wines at pop-in-law's. This mature Cabernet was dark and opaque with a nice perfume of cassis and a hint of mint. Fruity and rich, but not at all overwhelming. Quite good with our steaks. This is the third or fourth vintage I've tasted with pop-in-law and I'm a fan.

NV Perrier Jouet Champagne, about $30. A flute was handed to me one evening and I took the opportunity to taste the wine "blind." I guessed it might be an American bubbly because it was a little sweet, and it was without the chalky yeasty thing that says "I am Champagne, hear me roar." Imagine my surprise when the bottle appeared to top off our flutes and it was Perrier Jouet, thus far my favorite big house Champagne. Ah, the humbling glory of tasting blind...It was good, but didn't hold a candle, in my opinion, to the grower stuff I've been digging lately.

2002 Domaine William Fevre 2002 Chablis Grand Cru Bougros, price unknown but probably about $45. I am just starting out on Chablis and I already have a little thing for Fevre, so when pop-in-law handed me his wine list, I eagerly selected it to accompany a dinner of shrimp salad and market vegetables. Sadly, it was distinctly underwhelming. Lots of oak, a very restrained nose and palate. Some clean lime after 45 minutes, but the personality on this wine is a no-show. Where are the minerals? The nervy acidity? Where, I beg of you, WHERE?

2000 Baumard Cremant de Loire Cuvee Millisime, $7 per glass at Cafe Chloe (below). Baumard, one of my favorite Loire Valley producers, is famous for dry Savennieres and sweet wines from Coteaux de Layon and Quarts de Chaume AOCs. This was my first taste of one of Baumard's sparkling wine. It had a light floral nose and an elegant and fresh tasting palate of citrus and green apple. A bit mineral, and very tasty. I haven't seen this wine at my local haunts, and I have no idea what the price would be per bottle, but I'm guessing around $15, and it would be a good value at that price.

2002 Baumard Savennieres Clos du Papillon, about $25, no longer available. This is Baumard's most highly rated Savennieres. Probably opened too early. The wine had an interesting but jumbled and tight nose of flowers, barrel toast, citrus, and what seemed like white chocolate. Medium body, nice hints of vanilla, ginger, and minerals, with good acidity, but palate too is tight and young, a little backward. I have a bottle of this wine somewhere and I am excited to taste it...in about 10 years.

Now to sum everything up, I agree with Scotty. It's a moot post with no pic's! I hope ya'll are still with me![/quote:2g8c4eus]
Yup
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Old 09-13-2007, 09:18 PM   #9
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Without further ado, un arroze con dos pollos.



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Old 09-14-2007, 09:07 AM   #10
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Very Nice!
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