1st King Cake of 2013 - BBQ Central

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Old 01-11-2013, 10:02 AM   #1
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1st King Cake of 2013

Yesterday on the way to work I decided on the spur of the moment to stop in at one of the local bakeries and grab a King cake. This one will be from Frances' bakery and is the first one of the year for us which some years we have had many and some years only a couple. For the first one of 2013 I chose to get a cream cheese filled version. This one going to be a good one. I could smell it through the plastic bag it was in. .


When I got to work I brought it into the office because it was getting ready to pour down raining and the dampness in the air was going to make the sugar and icing topping get all melty gooey and stick to the bag. So, I brought it in and put it on one of the counters. I have to say several times during the day I was very tempted to open it and cut off a big chunk to eat. Instead I fought off that craving and it wasn't long after eating dinner that I had to have a slice.

Sweet delicious goodness!

As you can see in this picture the cream cheese filling is actually a filling baked into the cake. Many others put the filling in the center of the top of the cake and cover that with the icing and colored sugars.

This is a really good King cake and so far no one has gotten the baby yet. I'm thinking I'll cut a slice to bring with me to work for a lil snack later today. With my luck I'll probably get the baby and have to buy the next King cake.

I'm thinking about making my own homemade version this weekend.
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Old 01-11-2013, 11:15 AM   #2
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Well I was getting ready to bite into that slice brought for a mid morning snack and what do I find? The BABY! Lol...... Looks like I'll be buying the next King cake.
Sorry, not a very good picture. I used an older camera from the office.

Reminds me of a time many years ago where I used to work. We used to have a King cake every Friday. It never failed that some people always managed to NOT get the baby whenever someone brought in a King cake. Well, I put a stop to that. On an occaision that I had gotten the baby and it was my turn to bring in the cake for the following Friday I knew someone that worked at the bakery I got the cake from. I special ordered a cake with about two dozen King cake babies in it. That way EVERYONE was darn sure going to get a baby. The person that got the little brown baby was the one who was the designated winner or loser depending how you look at it. Needless to say we all had a laugh and someone did indeed get the brown baby. I'll never forget that.
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Old 01-11-2013, 12:50 PM   #3
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Dang that looks good. Smart thinking on the multiple Baby Jesus's.
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Old 01-11-2013, 07:44 PM   #4
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Damn ... Does that look good T!
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Old 01-12-2013, 09:35 AM   #5
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Thanks guys! Hey if any of you all are so inclined to try a King cake for the first time there are a ton of places that will ship them "next day". The shipping might be more than the cake but it's a nice treat for the family or the office.
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Old 01-12-2013, 10:05 PM   #6
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Alright the first King cake was delicious and my son had an ahnvie for another King cake so he went out and came home with not one but two King cakes. These are from Manny Randazzo's and he was told these were the last two they had. This was about 11:30 this morning.
The two he came home with are another cream cheese filled and a Pecan Praline topping version. The Cream Cheese filled one is good but the one from Frances' Bakery was better. Now the Pecan Praline topped one is delicious!
Cream Cheese Filled


And of course my luck prevails. I cut right into the baby this time.

The Pecan Praline Topping KC.

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Old 01-13-2013, 09:21 AM   #7
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Those are real popular with the school teacher/admin crowd. Guess cause they taste good and everybody can have a chunk..then hopefully somebody hit the plastic Baby Jesus and have to buy the cake next time.
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Old 01-13-2013, 09:30 AM   #8
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We really don't correlate the king cake baby with baby Jesus. Originally it was a bean and somehow became a baby. Rarely is it mentioned here to be related to Jesus.
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Old 01-14-2013, 01:29 PM   #9
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Sorry to hear about the mis-corrolating..lol. Yeppers..that particular cake is dripping in religiousity. Christ is the King..thats how it got its name. The Cajones prob started out using beans cuz they couldnt afford the plastic Baby Jesus. Surprised they cant find room for the Virgin in there somewhere..lol. Near all them Cajones is dedicated Mackeral Snappers ya know? That particular fond euphemism was designed to reflect on their one time penchant to not eat meat on Fridays..so they snapped mackerals..and frogs..and lizzards lol.
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Old 01-14-2013, 02:33 PM   #10
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The "king cake" takes its name from the biblical three kings. In Catholic liturgical tradition, the Solemnity of Epiphany - commemorated on January 6th - celebrates the visit of the Magi to the Christ Child. The Eve of Epiphany (the night of January 5th) is popularly known as Twelfth Night (the Twelve Days of Christmas are counted from Christmas Eve until this night). The season for king cake extends from the end of the Twelve Days of Christmas (Twelfth Night and Epiphany Day), up until Mardi Gras, or "Fat Tuesday;" the day before the start of Lent. Some organizations or groups of friends may have "king cake parties" every week through the Carnival season. In Portugal, whoever gets the King cake trinket is expected to buy the next cake for these get-togethers.

In the southern United States, the tradition was brought to the area by colonists from France and Spain and is associated with Carnival (also known as Mardi Gras). Celebrated across the Gulf Coast region from the Florida Panhandle to East Texas, it originated in French Louisiana and King cake parties in New Orleans are documented back to the eighteenth century.

The king cake of the New Orleans tradition comes in a number of styles. The most simple, said to be the most traditional, is a ring of twisted bread similar to that used in brioche topped with icing or sugar, usually colored purple, green, and gold (the traditional Mardi Gras colors) with food coloring. In 1972, a small bakery in Picayune, Mississippi, Paul's Pastry, started adding fillings to King Cakes filling - the most common being cream cheese, praline, cinnamon, or strawberry. A so-called "Zulu King Cake" has chocolate icing with a coconut filling, because the Krewe of Zulu parade's most celebrated throw is a coconut. Also, some bakers have now taken the liberty to offer king cakes for other holidays that immediately surround Mardi Gras season, such as green and red-icing king cakes for Christmas, red and pink-icing cakes for Valentine's Day, and green and white-icing cakes for St. Patrick's Day. Others have gone a step further and produce specialty king cakes from the beginning of football season for Louisiana State University and New Orleans Saints tailgate parties, then for Halloween, then Thanksgiving - and do not cease until after Mardi Gras season with an Easter holiday king cake. Several markets sell the cakes during the season including Dorignac's. It has become customary in the Southern culture that whoever finds the trinket must provide the next king cake or host the next Mardi Gras party.

The traditional trinket in the cake is a bean, still seen in some European and Mexican traditions but rare in U.S. king cakes. It is echoed, however, in some krewes' use of a gilded bean trinket.

In the U.S. Gulf Coast since the 1950s, the most common trinket has been a small plastic baby doll. Earlier ceramic baby dolls as trinkets are documented in New Orleans back to the 1930s. A king wearing a crown is the next most common trinket. Other figures have been seen historically, and starting in the 1990s again became more common in the more expensive "gourmet" varieties of king cake. In New Orleans in recent years, figurines are sold in the shape of a breast or penis, or depict a man or woman in a lascivious pose. The common plastic baby of today is usually colored pink, brown, white or gold. Because of the potential choking hazard, some bakeries include the trinket separately from the pastry.

The person who gets the trinket is declared the King or Queen of the day. Sometimes there are separate cakes to select the king and queen. In New Orleans, the cake for women is sometimes called a Queen Cake. The king or queen is usually obligated to supply the next king cake or host the next party or both. King cake parties may be held at the homes of people who live on or near the routes of Mardi Gras parades.

In most workplaces, the one who finds the trinket must be bought lunch once a month until the next year, when they must provide the King Cake. The trinket holder also often gets to pick who buys them lunch every month. Another variation on this tradition is simplified so that workers share a king cake at lunch or during the day, with the person receiving the trinket bringing the cake for the next workday.

In Mexico, the one who finds the Baby Jesus must prepare tamales for the Candlemas feast.


King Cake...


2 envelopes active dry yeast
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1-1/2 sticks (6 ounces) unsalted butter, melted
1 cup warm milk (about 110°F)
5 large egg yolks, at room temperature
4 1/2 cups bleached all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
1 pound cream cheese, at room temperature
4 cups confectioner's sugar
1 plastic king cake baby or a pecan half
5 tablespoons milk, at room temperature
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
Purple-, green-, and gold-tinted sugar sprinkles

Combine the yeast and granulated sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook. Add the melted butter and warm milk. Beat at low speed for 1 minute. With the mixer running, add the egg yolks, then beat for 1 minute at medium-low speed. Add the flour, salt, nutmeg, and lemon zest and beat until everything is incorporated. Increase the speed to high and beat until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl, forms a ball, and starts to climb up the dough hook. (If the dough is uncooperative in coming together, add a bit of warm water (110 degrees), a tablespoon at a time, until it does.)

Remove the dough from the bowl. Using your hands, form the dough into a smooth ball. Lightly oil a bowl with the vegetable oil. Place the dough in the bowl and turn it to oil all sides. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside in a warm, draft-free place until doubled in size, about 2 hours.

Meanwhile, make the filling. In a large mixing bowl, combine the cream cheese and 1 cup of the confectioner's sugar. Blend by hand or with an electric mixer on low speed. Set aside.

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Using your fingers, pat it out into a rectangle about 30 inches long and 6 inches wide.

Spread the filling lengthwise over the bottom half of the dough, then flip the top half of the dough over the filling. Seal the edges, pinching the dough together. Shape the dough into a cylinder and place it on the prepared baking sheet seam side down. Shape the dough into a ring and pinch the ends together so there isn't a seam. Insert the king cake baby or pecan half into the ring from the bottom so that it is completely hidden by the dough.

Cover the ring with plastic wrap or a clean kitchen towel and place in a warm, draft-free place. Let the dough rise until doubled in size, about 45 minutes.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350°F.

Brush the top of the risen cake with 2 tablespoons of the milk. Bake until golden brown, 25 to 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool completely on a wire rack.

Make the icing. Combine the remaining 3 tablespoons milk, the lemon juice, and the remaining 3 cups confectioner's sugar in medium-size mixing bowl. Stir to blend well. With a rubber spatula, spread the icing evenly over the top of the cake. Sprinkle with the sugar crystals, alternating colors around the cake.
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